Test Your Science Knowledge

Here are some science questions to help you test your general science knowledge. They will also show you which of the Florida, Utah, and NGSS science standards each question is testing.

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We enjoy the hummingbirds that visit our feeders. I am trying to find the mixture of sugar and water that they like the best.

Each day, I put out four feeders with different amounts of water and sugar. At the end of each day, I measure to see how much of each the hummingbirds drank. Which of the following is NOT an important part of this experiment?

  1. One of the feeders should only contain water, with no sugar.

    No. This IS an important part of the experiment. The feeder without any sugar is the control. If the hummingbirds drink just as much pure water, it would indicate that the sugar is not important.
  2. The feeders should be placed randomly every day.

    No. This IS an important part of the experiment. If you always put the same mixture in the same location, the results may be because the birds like that location instead of because they like the amount of sugar.
  3. I should repeat this experiment every day for several weeks.

    No. This IS an important part of the experiment. The more times you repeat the same test, the more likely you are to get accurate results.
  4. The different mixtures should be colored different colors with nontoxic food coloring.

    Yes. This is NOT an important part of the experiment. It would add a second variable to the experiment, which is a bad thing. You want everything to be the same for each sample, with the only difference being the amount of sugar. If you used different colors and different amounts of sugar, you would to know whether the results were due to the color or the sugar.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.5.N.1.4 Identify a control group and explain its importance in an experiment.

SC.7.N.1.4 Identify test variables (independent variables) and outcome variables (dependent variables) in an experiment.

Utah

NGSS


3-5-ETS1-3 Plan and carry out fair tests in which variables are controlled and failure points are considered to identify aspects of a model or prototype that can be improved.

I want to test a new fertilizer, to find the best concentration for my garden. To do this, I plan to divide my garden into four sections.

Section A. I will use 5 grams of fertilizer per gallon each time I fertilize.

Section B. I will use 10 grams of fertilizer per gallon each time I fertilize.

Section C. I will use 15 grams of fertilizer per gallon each time I fertilize.

For section D, how much fertilizer per gallon should I use?

  1. 20 grams of fertilizer per gallon.

    No. This would be a good thing to test, but for this to be a proper science experiment, it is not the correct answer.
  2. 30 grams of fertilizer per gallon.

    No. This would be a good thing to test, but for this to be a proper science experiment, it is not the correct answer.
  3. 1 gram of fertilizer per gallon.

    No. This would be a good thing to test, but for this to be a proper science experiment, it is not the correct answer.
  4. No fertilizer at all.

    Yes. For this type of experiment, you need to have a control group. That is a group of test subjects that you do not do anything to. If the control group with no fertilizer grows just as well as the other groups, then I would know that the fertilizer was not working.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.5.N.1.4 Identify a control group and explain its importance in an experiment.

SC.7.N.1.4 Identify test variables (independent variables) and outcome variables (dependent variables) in an experiment.

Utah

NGSS


3-5-ETS1-3 Plan and carry out fair tests in which variables are controlled and failure points are considered to identify aspects of a model or prototype that can be improved.

Why are trees an important part of the water cycle?

  1. Trees need water.

    No. While trees do need water, that is not why they are part of the water cycle.
  2. Transpiration

    Yes! In order to get nutrients up to the top of a tree, it has to let water evaporate from its leaves. This process is called transpiration. One tree can put hundreds of gallons of water into the air as water vapor every day.
  3. Trees help prevent erosion.

    No. While trees can help prevent erosion, that is not why they are part of the water cycle.
  4. Condensation

    No. Trees are not a major source of condensation.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.4.P.8.2 Identify properties and common uses of water in each of its states.

SC.5.E.7.1 Create a model to explain the parts of the water cycle. Water can be a gas, a liquid, or a solid and can go back and forth from one state to another.

>>> Teacher Page: Water Cycle


SC.6.E.7.2 Investigate and apply how the cycling of water between the atmosphere and hydrosphere has an effect on weather patterns and climate.
Cloud Types video
Nephoscope video
The Water Cycle video
Weather and Climate video, free
Pine Cone Weather text page, free
Review Weather-8 practice
Review Weather-9 practice
Review Weather-10 practice

Utah


UT.4.I.2.b Describe the processes of evaporation, condensation, and precipitation as they relate to the water cycle.

UT.4.I.2.c Identify locations that hold water as it passes through the water cycle (e.g., oceans, atmosphere, fresh surface water, snow, ice, and ground water).

NGSS


MS-ESS2-4 Develop a model to describe the cycling of water through Earth’s systems driven by energy from the sun and the force of gravity.

The "strings" in a stalk of celery are made up of xylem and phloem. Which part of your body comes closest to serving the same function?

  1. Skeleton

    No. Your skeleton provides support and protection. In plants, the cell wall provides support and protection.
  2. Intestines

    No. Your intestines allow you to absorb nutrients from your food. Plants make their own food, so they do not need a digestive system.
  3. Nerves

    No. Your nerves carry signals to let the parts of your body communicate. They carry messages for your senses, to move your muscles, etc. Instead of having nerves, plants release chemicals that signal other parts of the plant.
  4. Blood Vessels

    Yes! Your blood vessels carry water and nutrients to different parts of your body. In plants, the xylem is made up of tubes that carry water and some nutrients from the roots upwards to other parts of the plant. The phloem is made up of tubes that carry the sugar produce by photosynthesis to other parts of the plant. While they work in very different ways, your blood vessels serve basically the same function (carrying water and nutrients) as the xylem and phloem in plants.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.3.L.14.1 Describe structures in plants and their roles in food production, support, water and nutrient transport, and reproduction.
Heartless Plants video, ClosedCaptions
Pumpkin Guts video, free, ClosedCaptions
Measuring Photosynthesis video
Seed Search video, free, ClosedCaptions
Orange Slices video, ClosedCaptions
Testing a Leaf for Starch video, ClosedCaptions
Flowers video, ClosedCaptions
Smell the Flowers text page
Review Plants-3 practice
Review Plants-2 practice
Review Plants-5 practice
Review Plants-6 practice
Review Plants-7 practice
Review Plants-8 practice

SC.5.L.14.2 Compare and contrast the function of organs and other physical structures of plants and animals, including humans, for example: some animals have skeletons for support — some with internal skeletons others with exoskeletons — while some plants have stems for support.
Bird Bones video
Reading a Skeleton video, free
Orange Slices video, ClosedCaptions
Thoughts on an Exoskeleton text page, free
Review Plants-5 practice
Review Plants-6 practice
Review Plants-7 practice

Utah


UT.6.V.1.b Compare characteristics common in observed organisms (e.g., color, movement, appendages, shape) and infer their function (e.g., green color found in organisms that are producers, appendages help movement).

UT.7.IV.2.d Relate the structure of organs to an organism’s ability to survive in a specific environment (e.g., hollow bird bones allow them to fly in air, hollow structure of hair insulates animals from hot or cold, dense root structure allows plants to grow in compact soil, fish fins aid fish in moving in water).
Hunting with an Umbrella video, ClosedCaptions
Bendable Bones video
Calling a Woodpecker video, free
Selective Smelling video
Seed Search video, free, ClosedCaptions
Orange Slices video, ClosedCaptions
Flowers video, ClosedCaptions
Onion Crystals video
Thoughts on an Exoskeleton text page, free
Review Plants-5 practice
Review Plants-6 practice
Review Plants-7 practice

NGSS


MS-LS1-1 Conduct an investigation to provide evidence that living things are made of cells; either one cell or many different numbers and types of cells.
Microscopes: Making a Hay Infusion video, free, learnalong
Microscopes: Making a Wet Mount video, learnalong
Microscopes: Making a Dry Mount video, learnalong
901 photo challenge, free

This is a lichen, which is actually a fungus and an algae living together. As it grows, it produces chemicals which dissolve some of the rock it grows on. This is an example of:

  1. Erosion

    No. Erosion means that the pieces of rocks are being carried away. The lichen is dissolving the rock, but not carrying it away.
  2. Weathering

    Yes! Lichens cause quite a bit of weathering in rocky areas.

  3. Both erosion and weathering

    No. The rock is not being moved, so it is not erosion.
  4. Neither erosion nor weathering

    No. As the lichen dissolves the rock, that is an example of weathering.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.4.E.6.1 Identify the three categories of rocks: igneous, (formed from molten rock); sedimentary (pieces of other rocks and fossilized organisms); and metamorphic (formed from heat and pressure).
Evaporites video, learnalong
Igneous Rocks and Bubbles video, learnalong
Sedimentary Rocks video, learnalong
What is a Rock? video, learnalong
Bioclastics: Rocks With No Minerals video
Homemade Fossil Dig text page
Foliated and Unfoliated Rocks text page, learnalong
Identifying Igneous Rocks text page, learnalong
Intrusive and Extrusive Igneous Rocks text page, learnalong
Light and Dark Minerals text page, learnalong
Review Rocks-10 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice
Review Rocks-1 practice
Review Rocks-2 practice
Review Rocks-3 practice
Review Rocks-4 practice
Review Rocks-5 practice
Review Rocks-6 practice
Review Rocks-8 practice
Review Rocks-9 practice
Review Rocks-7 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice

SC.7.E.6.2 Identify the patterns within the rock cycle and relate them to surface events (weathering and erosion) and sub-surface events (plate tectonics and mountain building).
Evaporites video, learnalong
What is a Rock? video, learnalong
The Rock Cycle video, learnalong
Change: Fast and Slow video
Erosion video
Continuous Change video
Bioclastics: Rocks With No Minerals video
Weathering and Erosion video, learnalong
Review Rocks-1 practice
Review Erosion-1 practice
Review Erosion-2 practice
Review Erosion-3 practice
Review Erosion-4 practice
Review Erosion-5 practice
Review Rocks-4 practice
Review Erosion-6 practice
Review Rocks-5 practice
Review Rocks-6 practice
Review Rocks-8 practice
Review Rocks-9 practice
Review Rocks-7 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice

Utah


UT.4.III.2.b Distinguish between weathering (i.e., wearing down and breaking of rock surfaces) and erosion (i.e., the movement of materials).

UT.5.II.1.a Identify the objects, processes, or forces that weather and erode Earth’s surface (e.g., ice, plants, animals, abrasion, gravity, water, wind)

UT.8.III.2.b Describe the role of energy in the processes that change rock materials over time.
Igneous Rocks and Bubbles video, learnalong
Sedimentary Rocks video, learnalong
Change: Fast and Slow video
Erosion video
Continuous Change video
Weathering and Erosion video, learnalong

NGSS


4-ESS2-1 Make observations and/or measurements to provide evidence of the effects of weathering or the rate of erosion by water, ice, wind, or vegetation.

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See which questions, videos, experiments, and other resources support each of your local science standards.