Test Your Science Knowledge

Here are some science questions to help you test your general science knowledge. They will also show you which of the Florida, Utah, and NGSS science standards each question is testing.

The questions are chosen randomly, so this quest will be different each time.

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This is a simple chart showing how energy flows through some of the parts of a food web. For example, the arrow from the grass to the grasshopper shows that the grasshopper gets it energy by eating the grass.

The hawk gets its energy by eating the water snake, but there is no arrow leading from the hawk. What should the arrow from the hawk point to>

  1. Egret

    No. The egret does not eat hawks.
  2. Carrion

    Yes! Carrion is dead animals. When the hawk eventually dies, flies will get their energy by eating the dead body. You could also draw arrows from all of the other animals to carrion.
  3. The Sun

    No. The Sun is not on the chart, and The Sun does not get its energy from the hawk.
  4. There should not be an arrow leading from the hawk.

    No. Energy cannot be destroyed. It always goes back into the system.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.4.L.17.3 Trace the flow of energy from the Sun as it is transferred along the food chain through the producers to the consumers.
Scavengers and Decomposers video, free, ClosedCaptions, Updated
Secondary Consumers video, free, ClosedCaptions, Updated, checked
Producers video, free, Updated, checked
Primary Consumers video, ClosedCaptions, Updated, checked
Food Web Tag text page
What is a Food Web? text page, free, checked
Review Food Web-1 practice
Review Food Web-3 practice
Review Food Web-4 practice
Review Food Web-5 practice
Review Food Web-6 practice
Review Food Web-7 practice
Review Food Web-8 practice
Review Food Web-9 practice
Review Food Web-10 practice
Review Food Web-2 practice

SC.8.L.18.4 Cite evidence that living systems follow the Laws of Conservation of Mass and Energy.
Thoughts on Trees text page
What is a Food Web? text page, free, checked
Review Food Web-10 practice

Utah


UT.8.II.2.a Categorize the relationships between organisms (i.e., producer/consumer/decomposer, predator/prey, mutualism/parasitism) and provide examples of each.
Secondary Consumers video, free, ClosedCaptions, Updated, checked
Producers video, free, Updated, checked
Primary Consumers video, ClosedCaptions, Updated, checked
What is a Food Web? text page, free, checked
Review Food Web-7 practice
Review Food Web-8 practice
Review Food Web-9 practice
Review Food Web-10 practice
Review Food Web-11 practice
Review Food Web-12 practice
Review Food Web-2 practice
Review Food Web-1 practice
Review Food Web-3 practice
Review Food Web-4 practice
Review Food Web-5 practice
Review Food Web-6 practice

NGSS


5-PS3-1 Use models to describe that energy in animals’ food (used for body repair, growth, motion, and to maintain body warmth) was once energy from the sun.
Measuring Calories video, ClosedCaptions, checked
Scavengers and Decomposers video, free, ClosedCaptions, Updated
Secondary Consumers video, free, ClosedCaptions, Updated, checked
Producers video, free, Updated, checked
Measuring Photosynthesis video, checked
Primary Consumers video, ClosedCaptions, Updated, checked
What is a Food Web? text page, free, checked
Calories: Measuring the Energy text page, free
Review Food Web-1 practice
Review Food Web-3 practice
Review Food Web-4 practice
Review Food Web-5 practice
Review Food Web-6 practice
Review Food Web-7 practice
Review Food Web-8 practice
Review Food Web-9 practice
Review Food Web-10 practice
Review Food Web-2 practice

5-LS2-1 Develop a model to describe the movement of matter among plants, animals, decomposers, and the environment.
Scavengers and Decomposers video, free, ClosedCaptions, Updated
Secondary Consumers video, free, ClosedCaptions, Updated, checked
Producers video, free, Updated, checked
Primary Consumers video, ClosedCaptions, Updated, checked
What is a Food Web? text page, free, checked
Review Food Web-3 practice
Review Food Web-4 practice
Review Food Web-5 practice
Review Food Web-6 practice
Review Food Web-7 practice
Review Food Web-8 practice
Review Food Web-9 practice
Review Food Web-10 practice
Review Food Web-2 practice
Review Food Web-1 practice

The Earth stays in orbit around the Sun because:

  1. The Sun's gravity pulls on the Earth

    This is only part of the answer.
  2. The Earth's gravity pulls on the Sun

    This is only part of the answer.
  3. The gravity of the Sun and the Earth pull on each other

    Yes! The gravitational attraction between the Earth and the Sun is a result of both the Sun pulling on the Earth and the Earth pulling on the Sun.
  4. Gravity does not keep the Earth in its orbit.

    No. Without the pull of gravity, the Earth would continue moving in a straight path instead of curving around the Sun.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.5.P.13.1 Identify familiar forces that cause objects to move, such as pushes or pulls, including gravity acting on falling objects.
The Slow Race video, free, ClosedCaptions, Updated
Magic Coin video
Making a Compass video, checked
Torque video
Water in a Glass, part 2 video, checked
Water in a Glass, part 3 video, checked
Water in a Glass, part 1 video, checked
Obedient Coin video, checked
Balancing a Meter Stick text page
Review Space-13 quest

SC.8.E.5.9 Explain the impact of objects in space on each other including: 1. the Sun on the Earth including seasons and gravitational attraction 2. the Moon on the Earth, including phases, tides, and eclipses, and the relative position of each body.
Global Science video, ClosedCaptions
Why is a Full Moon So Bright? text page, free, checked
Review Space-13 quest
Review Space-12 practice

SC.6.P.13.2 Explore the Law of Gravity by recognizing that every object exerts gravitational force on every other object and that the force depends on how much mass the objects have and how far apart they are.
Water in a Glass, part 2 video, checked
Water in a Glass, part 3 video, checked
Water in a Glass, part 1 video, checked
Planets and Pennies video, ClosedCaptions
Force, Pressure, and Shoes video, checked
Review Space-13 quest

Utah


UT.3.IV.2.c Pose questions about gravity and forces.

UT.6.III.3.a Describe the forces holding Earth in orbit around the sun, and the moon in orbit around Earth.

NGSS


MS-ESS1-2 Develop and use a model to describe the role of gravity in the motions within galaxies and the solar system.
Planets and Pennies video, ClosedCaptions
Review Space-13 quest
Review Space-10 practice

The yellow lines show how light is bent as it passes through a magnifying glass. This is an example of:

  1. Absorption

    No. The glass is clear, telling us that very little of the light is being absorbed. Absorption does not bend the light.
  2. Diffusion

    No. Diffusion is the scattering of light as it is reflected in many different directions. Diffusion would make the rays of light go in many different directions.
  3. Refraction

    Yes! Refraction bends light as it moves from one substance to another. As the light passes through the curved lens of the magnifying glass its path is changed, bending the rays towards the focal point.
  4. Reflection

    No. While some light is reflected from the glass, it is not responsible for the bending of the light.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.3.P.10.3 Demonstrate that light travels in a straight line until it strikes an object or travels from one medium to another.
Growing Crystals Under the Microscope video, free, learnalong, checked
Changing the Speed of Light video
Why is Foam White? video, checked
Microscopes: Growing Crystals video, free, learnalong, Updated
Sunglass Science: Birefringence video, free, Updated
Sunglass Science: Polarized Light video, free, Updated
Mirage video, free, ClosedCaptions, Updated
Pinhole Eyeglasses video, checked
Why Wet Things Turn Dark video, checked
A Long Lens text page
Review Light-2 practice
Review Light-3 practice
Review Light-4 practice
Review Light-5 practice
Review Light-1 practice

SC.3.P.10.4 Demonstrate that light can be reflected, refracted, and absorbed.
Why Wet Things Turn Dark video, checked
Growing Crystals Under the Microscope video, free, learnalong, checked
Changing the Speed of Light video
Why is Foam White? video, checked
Onion Crystals video
Microscopes: Growing Crystals video, free, learnalong, Updated
Sunglass Science: Birefringence video, free, Updated
Sunglass Science: Polarized Light video, free, Updated
Mirage video, free, ClosedCaptions, Updated
Pinhole Eyeglasses video, checked
Looking for Rainbows video
Sunlight, Energy, and Crayons text page, free
A Long Lens text page
Review Light-2 practice
Review Light-3 practice
Review Light-4 practice
Review Light-5 practice
Review Light-1 practice

SC.7.P.10.2 Observe and explain that light can be reflected, refracted, and/or absorbed.
Why Wet Things Turn Dark video, checked
Growing Crystals Under the Microscope video, free, learnalong, checked
Finding Fat in Foods video, ClosedCaptions, checked
Changing the Speed of Light video
Onion Crystals video
Why is Foam White? video, checked
Microscopes: Growing Crystals video, free, learnalong, Updated
Sunglass Science: Birefringence video, free, Updated
Sunglass Science: Polarized Light video, free, Updated
Mirage video, free, ClosedCaptions, Updated
Pinhole Eyeglasses video, checked
A Long Lens text page
Sunlight, Energy, and Crayons text page, free
Review Light-1 practice
Review Light-2 practice
Review Light-3 practice
Review Light-4 practice
Review Light-5 practice

Utah


UT.8.IV.1.b Compare the transfer of energy (i.e., sound, light, earthquake waves, heat) through various mediums.
Spoon Bells video, checked
The Singing Glass video, checked
Why Wet Things Turn Dark video, checked
The Science of Pizza video, checked
Heating a Balloon video, ClosedCaptions, checked
Changing the Speed of Light video
Doppler Effect video, checked
Solar Power video, checked
Sunglass Science: Birefringence video, free, Updated
Sunglass Science: Polarized Light video, free, Updated
Noisy String video, checked
Mirage video, free, ClosedCaptions, Updated
About Microwaves video, checked
Microwave Chocolate video, checked
Comparing How Sound Moves Through Liquids and Gases text page
Review Light-1 practice
Review Light-2 practice
Review Light-4 practice
Review Light-5 practice

NGSS


1-PS4-3 Plan and conduct an investigation to determine the effect of placing objects made with different materials in the path of a beam of light.
Why Wet Things Turn Dark video, checked
Growing Crystals Under the Microscope video, free, learnalong, checked
Sunprints video
Changing the Speed of Light video
Why is Foam White? video, checked
Onion Crystals video
Microscopes: Growing Crystals video, free, learnalong, Updated
Sunglass Science: Birefringence video, free, Updated
Sunglass Science: Polarized Light video, free, Updated
Mirage video, free, ClosedCaptions, Updated
A Color You Can't See video, free, checked
Pinhole Eyeglasses video, checked
A Long Lens text page
Review Light-1 practice
Review Light-2 practice
Review Light-3 practice
Review Light-4 practice
Review Light-5 practice

MS-PS4-2 Develop and use a model to describe that waves are reflected, absorbed, or transmitted through various materials.
Why Wet Things Turn Dark video, checked
Onion Crystals video
Sunprints video
Finding Fat in Foods video, ClosedCaptions, checked
Changing the Speed of Light video
Why is Foam White? video, checked
Sunglass Science: Birefringence video, free, Updated
Sunglass Science: Polarized Light video, free, Updated
Mirage video, free, ClosedCaptions, Updated
About Microwaves video, checked
Microwave Chocolate video, checked
A Long Lens text page
Sunlight, Energy, and Crayons text page, free
Review Light-2 practice
Review Light-4 practice
Review Light-5 practice
Review Light-1 practice

It takes the Earth 24 hours to:

  1. Rotate

    Yes. The Earth turns on its axis to make one full rotation every 24 hours.
  2. Revolve

    No. It takes a year for the Earth to revolve around the Sun.
  3. Orbit

    No. It takes a year for the Earth to orbit around the Sun.
  4. Reverse

    No. The motion of the Earth does not reverse.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.4.E.5.3 Recognize that Earth revolves around the Sun in a year and rotates on its axis in a 24-hour day.
Making a Scale Model of the Solar System video, ClosedCaptions
Global Science video, ClosedCaptions
Finding Your Way video, checked
Review Space-11 practice

SC.8.E.5.7 Compare and contrast the properties of objects in the Solar System including the Sun, planets, and moons to those of Earth, such as gravitational force, distance from the Sun, speed, movement, temperature, and atmospheric conditions.
Making a Scale Model of the Solar System video, ClosedCaptions
Global Science video, ClosedCaptions
Planets and Pennies video, ClosedCaptions
Review Space-4 practice
Review Space-11 practice

Utah


UT.3.I.2.a Describe the motions of Earth (i.e., the rotation [spinning] of Earth on its axis, the revolution [orbit] of Earth around the sun).
Global Science video, ClosedCaptions
Review Space-11 practice

UT.6.I.2.a Identify the difference between the motion of an object rotating on its axis and an object revolving in orbit.
Review Space-11 practice

NGSS

Which position would the Moon be in during an eclipse of the Sun?

  1. A

    No. In this position, the Earth would not be in the Moon's shadow.
  2. B

    Yes! Solar eclipses only happen during a new moon, but even then, the alignment has to be just right for the Moon's shadow to fall on the Earth.
  3. C

    No. In this position, the Earth would not be in the Moon's shadow.
  4. D

    No. In this position, the Earth would not be in the Moon's shadow. You might get a lunar eclipse in this position, but not a solar eclipse.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.4.E.5.2 Describe the changes in the observable shape of the moon over the course of about a month.
Why is a Full Moon So Bright? text page, free, checked
Review Space-6 practice
Review Space-7 practice
Review Space-9 practice

Utah


UT.3.I.1.b Explain that the sun is the source of light that lights the moon.
Why is a Full Moon So Bright? text page, free, checked
Review Space-6 practice
Review Space-7 practice
Review Space-9 practice

UT.6.I.1.a Describe changes in the appearance of the moon during a month.
Why is a Full Moon So Bright? text page, free, checked
Review Space-6 practice
Review Space-7 practice
Review Space-9 practice

NGSS


MS-ESS1-1 Develop and use a model of the Earth-sun-moon system to describe the cyclic patterns of lunar phases, eclipses of the sun and moon, and seasons.
Global Science video, ClosedCaptions
Why is a Full Moon So Bright? text page, free, checked
Review Space-6 practice
Review Space-7 practice
Review Space-9 practice
Review Space-12 practice

The questions are chosen randomly, so this quest will be different each time.

Get 5 more random questions.

Would you rather see the most recently added questions?



See which questions, videos, experiments, and other resources support each of your local science standards.