Test Your Science Knowledge

Here are some science questions to help you test your general science knowledge. They will also show you which of the Florida, Utah, and NGSS science standards each question is testing.

The questions are chosen randomly, so this quest will be different each time.

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What is the function of the fluffy, white part of the milkweed seed?

  1. It protects the seed from insects.

    No. Insects could easily eat the seed, even with the fluffy top.
  2. It helps hide the seeds from birds.

    No. The white fluff actually makes it easier for birds to find the seeds, but the moving air from their wings also helps spread the seeds.
  3. It gathers pollen.

    No. The seed has already been pollinated before the fluff develops.
  4. It causes the wind to spread the seeds.

    Yes! The fluffy part of the seed acts like a parachute to let the seeds blow long distances with the wind. This spreads the plant's seeds over a large area.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.5.L.17.1 Compare and contrast adaptations displayed by animals and plants that enable them to survive in different environments such as life cycles variations, animal behaviors and physical characteristics.
Onion Crystals video
A Walk in the Park video
Nature Watching video
Calling a Woodpecker video
Selective Smelling video
Seed Search video, ClosedCaptions
Flowers video, ClosedCaptions
Review Plants-1 practice
Review Adaptation-2 practice
Review Adaptation-3 practice
Review Adaptation-4 practice
Review Adaptation-5 practice
Review Adaptation-6 practice

Utah


UT.6.V.1.b Compare characteristics common in observed organisms (e.g., color, movement, appendages, shape) and infer their function (e.g., green color found in organisms that are producers, appendages help movement).

NGSS


3-LS4-2 Use evidence to construct an explanation for how the variations in characteristics among individuals of the same species may provide advantages in surviving, finding mates, and reproducing.
Flowers video, ClosedCaptions
Who Evolved on First? text page, free
Review Adaptation-1 practice
Review Adaptation-3 practice
Review Adaptation-4 practice
Review Adaptation-5 practice
Review Adaptation-6 practice

MS-LS1-4 Use argument based on empirical evidence and scientific reasoning to support an explanation for how characteristic animal behaviors and specialized plant structures affect the probability of successful reproduction of animals and plants respectively.
Bacteria and Antibiotics video, ClosedCaptions
Flowers video, ClosedCaptions
Onion Crystals video
A Walk in the Park video
Nature Watching video
Calling a Woodpecker video
Selective Smelling video
Pumpkin Guts video, ClosedCaptions
Seed Search video, ClosedCaptions
Orange Slices video, ClosedCaptions
How Does a Butterfly Fly? text page, free
Thoughts on an Exoskeleton text page, free
Review Adaptation-3 practice
Review Plants-2 practice
Review Plants-4 practice
Review Adaptation-4 practice
Review Adaptation-5 practice
Review Adaptation-6 practice
Review Plants-8 practice

Which organ produces insulin to control blood sugar levels?

  1. Liver

    No. The liver produces bile, which digests fats.
  2. Gall Bladder

    No. The gall bladder stores the bile produced by the liver.
  3. Pancreas

    Yes! The pancreas produces insulin.
  4. Thyroid

    No. The thyroid produces several hormones which control growth and metabolism, but it does not produce insulin.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.2.L.14.1 Distinguish human body parts (brain, heart, lungs, stomach, muscles, and skeleton) and their basic functions.

SC.5.L.14.1 Identify the organs in the human body and describe their functions, including the skin, brain, heart, lungs, stomach, liver, intestines, pancreas, muscles and skeleton, reproductive organs, kidneys, bladder, and sensory organs.

SC.6.L.14.5 Identify and investigate the general functions of the major systems of the human body (digestive, respiratory, circulatory, reproductive, excretory, immune, nervous, and musculoskeletal) and describe ways these systems interact with each other to maintain homeostasis.

Utah


UT.7.III.2.c Relate the structure of an organ to its component parts and the larger system of which it is a part.

NGSS


MS-LS1-3 Use argument supported by evidence for how the body is a system of interacting subsystems composed of groups of cells.

What do you have to do to replicate an experiment?

  1. You do the same experiment several times.

    No. Doing the same experiment several times is repetition, not replication.
  2. You do the same experiment that someone else did.

    Yes. By replicating an experiment exactly, you should get the same results as the original experiment.
  3. You do an improved version of someone's experiment.

    For replication, you do the experiment exactly as the original scientist did, without making any changes.
  4. You look for errors in someone's experiment.

    The purpose of replication is to verify, not to look for errors.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.2.N.1.4 Explain how particular scientific investigations should yield similar conclusions when repeated.

SC.5.N.2.2 Recognize and explain that when scientific investigations are carried out, the evidence produced by those investigations should be replicable by others.

>>> Teacher Page: Nature of Science and Dissolving


SC.6.N.1.2 Explain why scientific investigations should be replicable.

SC.7.N.1.2 Differentiate replication (by others) from repetition (multiple trials).

SC.8.N.1.2 Design and conduct a study using repeated trials and replication.

Utah

NGSS

Which of the following states of matter will change its shape to fit its container, but not its size?

  1. Solid

    No. Under normal pressure, solids do not change their shape or size to fit their container.
  2. Liquid

    Yes. Liquids will take on the shape of their container, but do not change their size.
  3. Gas

    No. Gases will expand to fill their container, taking on both its shape and size.
  4. Plasma

    No. Like gases, plasmas take on the size and shape of their container.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.2.P.8.3 Recognize that solids have a definite shape and that liquids and gases take the shape of their container.

SC.5.P.8.1 Compare and contrast the basic properties of solids, liquids, and gases, such as mass, volume, color, texture, and temperature.

>>> Teacher Page: States of Matter


SC.8.P.8.1 Explore the scientific theory of atoms (also known as atomic theory) by using models to explain the motion of particles in solids, liquids, and gases.

Utah


UT.5.I.2.a Identify the physical properties of matter (e.g., hard, soft, solid, liquid, gas).

UT.7.I.1.c Diagram the arrangement of particles in the physical states of matter (i.e., solid, liquid, gas).

UT.8.I.1.b Classify substances based on their chemical and physical properties (e.g., reacts with water, does not react with water, flammable or nonflammable, hard or soft, flexible or nonflexible, evaporates or melts at room temperature).

NGSS

Which of the following is likely a sign that it will rain soon?

  1. Rising temperature

    No. A warm air mass moving into your area might bring rain, but it also might bring sunny weather. Rising temperature by itself is not a good indicator of rain.
  2. Decreasing humidity

    No. The humidity at ground level does not play much of a role in the formation of rain in the clouds. Just before it rains, the precipitation could cause the humidity to increase, but it would not cause it to decrease.
  3. Wind out of the west

    No. Any weather front moving in from the west could cause winds, even if it was bringing clear, sunny weather.
  4. Falling barometric pressure

    Yes! Low pressure fronts are commonly associated with rain and storms, so falling barometric pressure is a good indicator that rain may be on the way.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.5.E.7.3 Recognize how air temperature, barometric pressure, humidity, wind speed and direction, and precipitation determine the weather in a particular place and time.

Utah


UT.4.II.3.a Identify and use the tools of a meteorologist (e.g., measure rainfall using rain gauge, measure air pressure using barometer, measure temperature using a thermometer).

NGSS


3-ESS2-1 Represent data in tables and graphical displays to describe typical weather conditions expected during a particular season.
Nephoscope video
Pine Cone Weather text page, free
Review Weather-5 practice
Review Weather-6 practice
Review Weather-4 practice
Review Weather-3 practice
Review Space-5 practice
Review Space-8 practice

MS-ESS2-5 Collect data to provide evidence for how the motions and complex interactions of air masses results in changes in weather conditions.
Cloud Types video
Nephoscope video
Cloud Formation, part 1 video, ClosedCaptions
Pine Cone Weather text page, free
Review Weather-1 practice
Review Weather-2 practice
Review Weather-6 practice
Review Weather-4 practice
Review Weather-3 practice

The questions are chosen randomly, so this quest will be different each time.

Get 5 more random questions.

Would you rather see the most recently added questions?



See which questions, videos, experiments, and other resources support each of your local science standards.