Test Your Science Knowledge

Here are some science questions to help you test your general science knowledge. They will also show you which of the Florida, Utah, and NGSS science standards each question is testing.

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This is called Marble. It was once limestone, but heat and pressure changed it, recrystallizing the calcite and distorting the layers. What kind of rock is it?.

  1. Igneous

    No. Igneous rocks formed from magma or lava. This is not an igneous rock.
  2. Sedimentary

    No. Sedimentary rocks are deposited by wind, water, ice, or gravity, and they often contain fossils. When it was limestone it was a sedimentary rock, but not now.
  3. Metamorphic

    Yes!. This marble been changed by heat and pressure from a different kind of rock. It is metamorphic.
  4. Marble is not a rock.

    No. Marble is a naturally occurring solid that forms large layers in the Earth. Marble is a rock.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.4.E.6.1 Identify the three categories of rocks: igneous, (formed from molten rock); sedimentary (pieces of other rocks and fossilized organisms); and metamorphic (formed from heat and pressure).
Bioclastics: Rocks With No Minerals video
Evaporites video, learnalong
Igneous Rocks and Bubbles video, learnalong
Sedimentary Rocks video, learnalong
What is a Rock? video, learnalong
Foliated and Unfoliated Rocks text page, learnalong
Identifying Igneous Rocks text page, learnalong
Intrusive and Extrusive Igneous Rocks text page, learnalong
Light and Dark Minerals text page, learnalong
Homemade Fossil Dig text page
Review Rocks-1 practice
Review Rocks-2 practice
Review Rocks-3 practice
Review Rocks-4 practice
Review Rocks-5 practice
Review Rocks-6 practice
Review Rocks-8 practice
Review Rocks-9 practice
Review Rocks-7 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice

SC.7.E.6.2 Identify the patterns within the rock cycle and relate them to surface events (weathering and erosion) and sub-surface events (plate tectonics and mountain building).
Continuous Change video
Bioclastics: Rocks With No Minerals video
Weathering and Erosion video, learnalong
Evaporites video, learnalong
What is a Rock? video, learnalong
The Rock Cycle video, learnalong
Change: Fast and Slow video
Erosion video
Review Rocks-1 practice
Review Erosion-1 practice
Review Erosion-2 practice
Review Erosion-3 practice
Review Erosion-4 practice
Review Erosion-5 practice
Review Rocks-4 practice
Review Erosion-6 practice
Review Rocks-5 practice
Review Rocks-6 practice
Review Rocks-8 practice
Review Rocks-9 practice
Review Rocks-7 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice

Utah


UT.4.III.1.a Describe the differences between minerals and rocks.

NGSS


4-ESS1-1 Identify evidence from patterns in rock formations and fossils in rock layers to support an explanation for changes in a landscape over time.

MS-ESS2-1 Develop a model to describe the cycling of Earth’s materials and the flow of energy that drives this process.
What is a Rock? video, learnalong
The Rock Cycle video, learnalong
Bioclastics: Rocks With No Minerals video
Definition of a Mineral video
Evaporites video, learnalong
Igneous Rocks and Bubbles video, learnalong
What is a Mineral? video
Identifying Minerals video, learnalong
Sedimentary Rocks video, learnalong
Light and Dark Minerals text page, learnalong
Review Rocks-1 practice
Review Rocks-2 practice
Review Rocks-3 practice
Review Rocks-4 practice
Review Rocks-5 practice
Review Rocks-6 practice
Review Rocks-8 practice
Review Rocks-9 practice
Review Rocks-7 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice

The Earth stays in orbit around the Sun because:

  1. The Sun's gravity pulls on the Earth

    This is only part of the answer.
  2. The Earth's gravity pulls on the Sun

    This is only part of the answer.
  3. The gravity of the Sun and the Earth pull on each other

    Yes! The gravitational attraction between the Earth and the Sun is a result of both the Sun pulling on the Earth and the Earth pulling on the Sun.
  4. Gravity does not keep the Earth in its orbit.

    No. Without the pull of gravity, the Earth would continue moving in a straight path instead of curving around the Sun.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.5.P.13.1 Identify familiar forces that cause objects to move, such as pushes or pulls, including gravity acting on falling objects.

SC.8.E.5.9 Explain the impact of objects in space on each other including: 1. the Sun on the Earth including seasons and gravitational attraction 2. the Moon on the Earth, including phases, tides, and eclipses, and the relative position of each body.
Global Science video, free, ClosedCaptions
Why is a Full Moon So Bright? text page, free
Review Space-13 quest
Review Space-12 practice

SC.6.P.13.2 Explore the Law of Gravity by recognizing that every object exerts gravitational force on every other object and that the force depends on how much mass the objects have and how far apart they are.

Utah


UT.3.IV.2.c Pose questions about gravity and forces.

UT.6.III.3.a Describe the forces holding Earth in orbit around the sun, and the moon in orbit around Earth.

NGSS


MS-ESS1-2 Develop and use a model to describe the role of gravity in the motions within galaxies and the solar system.
Planets and Pennies video, ClosedCaptions
Review Space-13 quest
Review Space-10 practice

This caterpillar is an example of which part of the food web?

  1. Producer.

    No. The plant is a producer. It captures energy from sunlight, and stores it as food. The caterpillar is eating the plant to get that energy.
  2. Primary Consumer.

    Yes! The caterpillar is eating the plant (a producer) to get the energy that is stored in its leaves.
  3. Secondary Consumer

    No. Secondary consumers eat other consumers. A bird that ate this caterpillar would be a secondary consumer.
  4. Decomposer

    No. Decomposers break down dead and decaying organisms. The plant that the caterpillar is eating is still alive and growing.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.4.L.17.3 Trace the flow of energy from the Sun as it is transferred along the food chain through the producers to the consumers.
Scavengers and Decomposers video, ClosedCaptions
Secondary Consumers video, ClosedCaptions
Producers video
Primary Consumers video, ClosedCaptions
What is a Food Web? text page
Food Web Tag text page
Review Food Web-1 practice
Review Food Web-3 practice
Review Food Web-4 practice
Review Food Web-5 practice
Review Food Web-6 practice
Review Food Web-7 practice
Review Food Web-8 practice
Review Food Web-9 practice
Review Food Web-10 practice
Review Food Web-2 practice

SC.7.L.17.1 Explain and illustrate the roles of and relationships among producers, consumers, and decomposers in the process of energy transfer in a food web.
Measuring Calories video, ClosedCaptions
Scavengers and Decomposers video, ClosedCaptions
Secondary Consumers video, ClosedCaptions
Producers video
Primary Consumers video, ClosedCaptions
What is a Food Web? text page
Food Web Tag text page
Review Food Web-1 practice
Review Food Web-3 practice
Review Food Web-4 practice
Review Food Web-5 practice
Review Food Web-6 practice
Review Food Web-7 practice
Review Food Web-8 practice
Review Food Web-9 practice
Review Food Web-10 practice
Review Food Web-2 practice

Utah


UT.8.II.2.a Categorize the relationships between organisms (i.e., producer/consumer/decomposer, predator/prey, mutualism/parasitism) and provide examples of each.
Secondary Consumers video, ClosedCaptions
Producers video
Primary Consumers video, ClosedCaptions
What is a Food Web? text page
Review Food Web-3 practice
Review Food Web-4 practice
Review Food Web-5 practice
Review Food Web-6 practice
Review Food Web-7 practice
Review Food Web-8 practice
Review Food Web-9 practice
Review Food Web-10 practice
Review Food Web-11 practice
Review Food Web-12 practice
Review Food Web-2 practice
Review Food Web-1 practice

NGSS


5-PS3-1 Use models to describe that energy in animals’ food (used for body repair, growth, motion, and to maintain body warmth) was once energy from the sun.
Measuring Calories video, ClosedCaptions
Scavengers and Decomposers video, ClosedCaptions
Secondary Consumers video, ClosedCaptions
Producers video
Measuring Photosynthesis video
Primary Consumers video, ClosedCaptions
Calories: Measuring the Energy text page, free
What is a Food Web? text page
Review Food Web-1 practice
Review Food Web-3 practice
Review Food Web-4 practice
Review Food Web-5 practice
Review Food Web-6 practice
Review Food Web-7 practice
Review Food Web-8 practice
Review Food Web-9 practice
Review Food Web-10 practice
Review Food Web-2 practice

5-LS2-1 Develop a model to describe the movement of matter among plants, animals, decomposers, and the environment.
Scavengers and Decomposers video, ClosedCaptions
Secondary Consumers video, ClosedCaptions
Producers video
Primary Consumers video, ClosedCaptions
What is a Food Web? text page
Review Food Web-1 practice
Review Food Web-3 practice
Review Food Web-4 practice
Review Food Web-5 practice
Review Food Web-6 practice
Review Food Web-7 practice
Review Food Web-8 practice
Review Food Web-9 practice
Review Food Web-10 practice
Review Food Web-2 practice

None of these layers have been turned upside down. Based on the Law of Superposition, which layer is the oldest?

  1. A

    No. Layer A is on top of layer B, so it is younger than layer B. That means that it is not the oldest.
  2. B

    No. If you look at layer B, it is on top of layer C, which means that it is younger than layer C. B is not the oldest.
  3. C

    No. Look closely at the top part of layer C. The top part of layer C is on top of part of layer D. That tells us that layer C is younger than layer D.
  4. D

    Yes! This one is a bit tricky, because of the way the rocks were formed. Layer D formed first, as a flat, horizontal layer. Erosion weathered the left part of D away, forming a sloping hillside. Image the photo with layers A, B, and C erased, and it looks like a sloping hillside.

    Next, a nearby volcano erupted, spewing out lots of volcanic ash. The ash covered the hillside, forming layer C.

    Next, lava from the volcano flowed down over the ash, forming layer B.

    Later, the volcano erupted again, depositing another layer of volcanic ash to form layer A. After that, layer A was covered by another layer of lava, and then another layer of volcanic ash.

    So A is the youngest, followed by B, then C, and D is the oldest.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.7.E.6.3 Identify current methods for measuring the age of Earth and its parts, including the law of superposition and radioactive dating.

Utah


UT.8.III.3.c Explain why some sedimentary rock layers may not always appear with youngest rock on top and older rocks below (i.e., folding, faulting).

NGSS


4-ESS1-1 Identify evidence from patterns in rock formations and fossils in rock layers to support an explanation for changes in a landscape over time.

Which position would the Moon be in during an eclipse of the Moon?

  1. A

    No. In this position, the Moon would not be in the Earth's shadow.
  2. B

    No. In this position, the Moon would not be in the Earth's shadow.
  3. C

    No. In this position, the Moon would not be in the Earth's shadow.
  4. D

    Yes. In this position, the Moon could be in the Earth's shadow. It does not always pass through the shadow, so we don't have an eclipse every month, but when it does, it will be in this position.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.4.E.5.2 Describe the changes in the observable shape of the moon over the course of about a month.
Why is a Full Moon So Bright? text page, free
Review Space-6 practice
Review Space-7 practice
Review Space-9 practice

Utah


UT.3.I.1.b Explain that the sun is the source of light that lights the moon.
Why is a Full Moon So Bright? text page, free
Review Space-6 practice
Review Space-7 practice
Review Space-9 practice

UT.6.I.1.a Describe changes in the appearance of the moon during a month.
Why is a Full Moon So Bright? text page, free
Review Space-6 practice
Review Space-7 practice
Review Space-9 practice

NGSS


MS-ESS1-1 Develop and use a model of the Earth-sun-moon system to describe the cyclic patterns of lunar phases, eclipses of the sun and moon, and seasons.
Global Science video, free, ClosedCaptions
Why is a Full Moon So Bright? text page, free
Review Space-12 practice
Review Space-6 practice
Review Space-7 practice
Review Space-9 practice

The questions are chosen randomly, so this quest will be different each time.

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See which questions, videos, experiments, and other resources support each of your local science standards.