Test Your Science Knowledge

Here are some science questions to help you test your general science knowledge. They will also show you which of the Florida, Utah, and NGSS science standards each question is testing.

The questions are chosen randomly, so this quest will be different each time.

Get 5 more random questions.

Would you rather see the most recently added questions?

None of these layers have been turned upside down. Based on the Law of Superposition, which layer is the oldest?

  1. A

    No. Layer A is on top of layer B, so it is younger than layer B. That means that it is not the oldest.
  2. B

    No. If you look at layer B, it is on top of layer C, which means that it is younger than layer C. B is not the oldest.
  3. C

    No. Look closely at the top part of layer C. The top part of layer C is on top of part of layer D. That tells us that layer C is younger than layer D.
  4. D

    Yes! This one is a bit tricky, because of the way the rocks were formed. Layer D formed first, as a flat, horizontal layer. Erosion weathered the left part of D away, forming a sloping hillside. Image the photo with layers A, B, and C erased, and it looks like a sloping hillside.

    Next, a nearby volcano erupted, spewing out lots of volcanic ash. The ash covered the hillside, forming layer C.

    Next, lava from the volcano flowed down over the ash, forming layer B.

    Later, the volcano erupted again, depositing another layer of volcanic ash to form layer A. After that, layer A was covered by another layer of lava, and then another layer of volcanic ash.

    So A is the youngest, followed by B, then C, and D is the oldest.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.7.E.6.3 Identify current methods for measuring the age of Earth and its parts, including the law of superposition and radioactive dating.

Utah


UT.8.III.3.c Explain why some sedimentary rock layers may not always appear with youngest rock on top and older rocks below (i.e., folding, faulting).

NGSS


4-ESS1-1 Identify evidence from patterns in rock formations and fossils in rock layers to support an explanation for changes in a landscape over time.
Evaporites video, learnalong, checked
Igneous Rocks and Bubbles video, free, learnalong, Updated
Sedimentary Rocks video, learnalong
Reading the Rocks: Law of Superposition video
Reading the Rocks: Law of Crosscutting video
What is a Rock? video, learnalong, checked
Reading the Rocks: The Present is the Key to the Past video, ClosedCaptions
Paleo Cookies video
Homemade Fossil Dig text page
Review Rocks-1 practice
Review Geologic Time-1 practice
Review Rocks-4 practice
Review Geologic Time-2 practice
Review Rocks-5 practice
Review Rocks-6 practice
Review Rocks-8 practice
Review Rocks-9 practice
Review Rocks-7 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice
Review Geologic Time-3 practice

When you mix cornstarch and water, you get something that many science sites call Oobleck. Under pressure, it feels like a solid, but when the pressure is removed, it flows like a liquid. What state of matter is it?

Answer:

This is a mixture, made up of particles of solid matter surrounded by a liquid. The mixture is not a single state of matter.

This is an important concept to understand, and it is seen in many things we use every day. A good example is the Egg States video, showing how a mixture of liquid and gas can seem to be a solid.

Before you try to decide if something is solid, liquid, gas, plasma, or some other state of matter, first make sure that it is a pure substance, and not a mixture of different states.

Learn more about the science of cornstarch and water here.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.2.P.8.2 Identify objects and materials as solid, liquid, or gas.
Egg States video, checked
Experimenting with Dry Ice video, free, checked
Ice Cream Science video, checked
Raw Egg or Boiled? video, checked
Air Space video
Teach It Right the First Time. text page, free
Review Matter-3 practice

SC.5.P.8.1 Compare and contrast the basic properties of solids, liquids, and gases, such as mass, volume, color, texture, and temperature.

>>> Teacher Page: States of Matter

A Bouncing Water Balloon video
Egg States video, checked
Experimenting with Dry Ice video, free, checked
Wax and Wood, part 1 video, checked
Wax and Wood, part 2 video, checked
Ice Cream Science video, checked
Raw Egg or Boiled? video, checked
Air Space video
Air has Weight text page
Teach It Right the First Time. text page, free
Review Matter-2 practice
Review Matter-1 practice
Review Matter-3 practice
Review Weather-10 practice

SC.8.P.8.1 Explore the scientific theory of atoms (also known as atomic theory) by using models to explain the motion of particles in solids, liquids, and gases.
A Bouncing Water Balloon video
Egg States video, checked
Experimenting with Dry Ice video, free, checked
Ice Cream Science video, checked
Expansion of Solids video, ClosedCaptions, checked
Review Matter-1 practice
Review Matter-3 practice

Utah


UT.5.I.2.a Identify the physical properties of matter (e.g., hard, soft, solid, liquid, gas).
A Bouncing Water Balloon video
Egg States video, checked
Experimenting with Dry Ice video, free, checked
Wax and Wood, part 1 video, checked
Wax and Wood, part 2 video, checked
Ice Cream Science video, checked
Raw Egg or Boiled? video, checked
Crushed Can video, checked
Review Matter-1 practice
Review Matter-3 practice

NGSS

Incandescent light bulbs use electrical energy to produce light energy, but it is not a direct transformation. Instead, the electrical energy is changed to a different form of energy, and then to light.

Electricity → ? → Light


What form of energy does the "?" represent?

  1. Sound

    No. Electrical energy can be transformed into sound energy, but that would not cause the bulb to light.
  2. Thermal

    Yes. As electrical energy flows through the filament, resistance changes the electrical energy into thermal energy. When the filament gets hot enough, some of the thermal energy is converted into light.
  3. Radiation

    No. The electrical energy is not transformed into radiation.
  4. Friction

    No. The electrical energy is not transformed into friction.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.2.P.10.1 Discuss that people use electricity or other forms of energy to cook their food, cool or warm their homes, and power their cars.
Review Energy-3 practice

SC.5.P.10.4 Investigate and explain that electrical energy can be transformed into heat, light, and sound energy, as well as the energy of motion.
Introduction to the LED video, checked
Light a Bulb with a Balloon video, checked
Electricity video, free, Updated
Review Energy-3 practice

SC.7.P.11.2 Investigate and describe the transformation of energy.
The Rollback Can video, free, Updated
High Bounce video, checked
Review Energy-3 practice

Utah


UT.3.V.2.c Predict, measure, and graph the temperature changes produced by a variety of mechanical machines and electrical devices while they are operating.
Review Energy-3 practice

UT.8.IV.4.b Trace the conversion of energy from one form of energy to another (e.g., light to chemical to mechanical).
Measuring Kinetic and Potential Energy video, checked
The Rollback Can video, free, Updated
High Bounce video, checked

NGSS


4-PS3-4 Apply scientific ideas to design, test, and refine a device that converts energy from one form to another.
Making a Screamer video, free, Updated
Measuring Kinetic and Potential Energy video, checked
The Singing Glass video, checked
The Slow Race video, free, ClosedCaptions, Updated
Whistle Stick video, text page, blog, free, checked
Simple Circuits video, checked
Solar Power video, checked
The Rollback Can video, free, Updated
A Grass Whistle video, checked
High Bounce video, checked
Bottle Tones, part 1 video, checked
Measuring Calories video, ClosedCaptions, checked
Bottle Tones, part 2 video, checked
Why Things Go Bang video
Why We Sweat video, checked
Sunglass Science: Birefringence video, free, Updated
Sunglass Science: Polarized Light video, free, Updated
Noisy String video, checked
Spoon Bells video, checked
Ice Cream Science video, checked
Sunlight, Energy, and Crayons text page, free
Review Energy-5 quest
Review Energy-3 practice

These flowers are so long and thin that only hummingbirds can get to the nectar. What would be the advantage of only letting certain creatures get the nectar?

  1. It makes it more likely that the flower will be pollinated.

    Yes! As you can see in the Flowers video, the flower needs a pollinator to carry its pollen to another flower of the same kind. If only hummingbirds can get to the nectar, they are more likely to visit other flowers of the same kind. By doing that, they carry pollen from one flower to another, pollenating them. That makes this a strong advantage for the plant.
  2. It keeps animals from eating the nectar.

    No. The nectar is supposed to be eaten. It serves as a treat to get animals to come to the flower.
  3. It helps the hummingbirds get more food.

    No. While getting more food would be an advantage for the hummingbirds, it would not help the plant.
  4. There is no advantage.

    No. Flowers have specific shapes, colors, and smells for a reason.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.5.L.17.1 Compare and contrast adaptations displayed by animals and plants that enable them to survive in different environments such as life cycles variations, animal behaviors and physical characteristics.
A Walk in the Park video, checked
Nature Watching video, checked
Calling a Woodpecker video, checked
Selective Smelling video, checked
Seed Search video, ClosedCaptions, checked
Flowers video, ClosedCaptions
Onion Crystals video
Review Plants-1 practice
Review Adaptation-2 practice
Review Adaptation-3 practice
Review Adaptation-4 practice
Review Adaptation-5 practice
Review Adaptation-6 practice

SC.5.L.15.1 Describe how, when the environment changes, differences between individuals allow some plants and animals to survive and reproduce while others die or move to new locations.
Who Evolved on First? text page, free, checked
Review Adaptation-1 practice
Review Adaptation-5 practice
Review Adaptation-6 practice

SC.7.L.15.3 Explore the scientific theory of evolution by relating how the inability of a species to adapt within a changing environment may contribute to the extinction of that species.

Utah


UT.4.V.2.b Cite examples of physical features that allow particular plants and animals to live in specific environments (e.g., duck has webbed feet, cactus has waxy coating).
Hunting with an Umbrella video, free, ClosedCaptions, Updated
A Walk in the Park video, checked
Seed Search video, ClosedCaptions, checked
Flowers video, ClosedCaptions
How Does a Butterfly Fly? text page, free
Review Adaptation-5 practice
Review Adaptation-6 practice

UT.5.V.2.c Describe how a particular physical attribute may provide an advantage for survival in one environment but not in another (e.g., heavy fur in arctic climates keep animals warm whereas in hot desert climates it would cause overheating; flippers on such animals as sea lions and seals provide excellent swimming structures in the water but become clumsy and awkward on land; cacti retain the right amount of water in arid regions but would develop root rot in a more temperate region; fish gills have the ability to absorb oxygen in water but not on land).

UT.6.V.1.b Compare characteristics common in observed organisms (e.g., color, movement, appendages, shape) and infer their function (e.g., green color found in organisms that are producers, appendages help movement).

UT.7.IV.2.a Predict why certain traits (e.g., structure of teeth, body structure, coloration) are more likely to offer an advantage for survival of an organism.
Selective Smelling video, checked
Onion Crystals video
Who Evolved on First? text page, free, checked
Thoughts on an Exoskeleton text page, free
Review Adaptation-1 practice
Review Adaptation-2 practice
Review Adaptation-5 practice
Review Adaptation-6 practice

NGSS


3-LS4-2 Use evidence to construct an explanation for how the variations in characteristics among individuals of the same species may provide advantages in surviving, finding mates, and reproducing.
Flowers video, ClosedCaptions
Who Evolved on First? text page, free, checked
Review Adaptation-1 practice
Review Adaptation-3 practice
Review Adaptation-4 practice
Review Adaptation-5 practice
Review Adaptation-6 practice

MS-LS1-4 Use argument based on empirical evidence and scientific reasoning to support an explanation for how characteristic animal behaviors and specialized plant structures affect the probability of successful reproduction of animals and plants respectively.
Onion Crystals video
A Walk in the Park video, checked
Nature Watching video, checked
Calling a Woodpecker video, checked
Selective Smelling video, checked
Pumpkin Guts video, free, ClosedCaptions, checked
Seed Search video, ClosedCaptions, checked
Orange Slices video, ClosedCaptions
Bacteria and Antibiotics video, ClosedCaptions
Flowers video, ClosedCaptions
How Does a Butterfly Fly? text page, free
Thoughts on an Exoskeleton text page, free
Review Adaptation-6 practice
Review Plants-8 practice
Review Adaptation-3 practice
Review Plants-2 practice
Review Plants-4 practice
Review Adaptation-4 practice
Review Adaptation-5 practice

These layers have not been overturned or folded. Based on that, which layer is the oldest?

  1. A

    No. A is on top, which means the other layers had to be there before it could be deposited. A is younger than B and C.
  2. B

    No. By the law of Superposition, layer C had to be in place before B could form on top of it. Layer B is older than A, but younger than C.
  3. C

    Yes! As the bottom layer, the Law of Superposition tells us that it is older than layers A and B. This layer had to be in place before A and B could form on top of it..
  4. D

    No. Layer D is actually a pile of rock fragments, mostly from layer A. These fragments are the result of weathering and erosion of layers A, B, and C. D is the youngest deposit at this location.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.7.E.6.3 Identify current methods for measuring the age of Earth and its parts, including the law of superposition and radioactive dating.

Utah


UT.8.III.3.c Explain why some sedimentary rock layers may not always appear with youngest rock on top and older rocks below (i.e., folding, faulting).

NGSS


4-ESS1-1 Identify evidence from patterns in rock formations and fossils in rock layers to support an explanation for changes in a landscape over time.
Evaporites video, learnalong, checked
Igneous Rocks and Bubbles video, free, learnalong, Updated
Sedimentary Rocks video, learnalong
Reading the Rocks: Law of Superposition video
Reading the Rocks: Law of Crosscutting video
What is a Rock? video, learnalong, checked
Reading the Rocks: The Present is the Key to the Past video, ClosedCaptions
Paleo Cookies video
Homemade Fossil Dig text page
Review Rocks-1 practice
Review Geologic Time-1 practice
Review Rocks-4 practice
Review Geologic Time-2 practice
Review Rocks-5 practice
Review Rocks-6 practice
Review Rocks-8 practice
Review Rocks-9 practice
Review Rocks-7 practice
Review Rocks-10 practice
Review Geologic Time-3 practice

The questions are chosen randomly, so this quest will be different each time.

Get 5 more random questions.

Would you rather see the most recently added questions?



See which questions, videos, experiments, and other resources support each of your local science standards.