Test Your Science Knowledge

Here are some science questions to help you test your general science knowledge. They will also show you which of the Florida, Utah, and NGSS science standards each question is testing.

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None of these layers have been turned upside down. Based on the Law of Superposition, which layer is the oldest?

  1. A

    No. Layer A is on top of layer B, so it is younger than layer B. That means that it is not the oldest.
  2. B

    No. If you look at layer B, it is on top of layer C, which means that it is younger than layer C. B is not the oldest.
  3. C

    No. Look closely at the top part of layer C. The top part of layer C is on top of part of layer D. That tells us that layer C is younger than layer D.
  4. D

    Yes! This one is a bit tricky, because of the way the rocks were formed. Layer D formed first, as a flat, horizontal layer. Erosion weathered the left part of D away, forming a sloping hillside. Image the photo with layers A, B, and C erased, and it looks like a sloping hillside.

    Next, a nearby volcano erupted, spewing out lots of volcanic ash. The ash covered the hillside, forming layer C.

    Next, lava from the volcano flowed down over the ash, forming layer B.

    Later, the volcano erupted again, depositing another layer of volcanic ash to form layer A. After that, layer A was covered by another layer of lava, and then another layer of volcanic ash.

    So A is the youngest, followed by B, then C, and D is the oldest.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.7.E.6.3 Identify current methods for measuring the age of Earth and its parts, including the law of superposition and radioactive dating.

Utah


UT.8.III.3.c Explain why some sedimentary rock layers may not always appear with youngest rock on top and older rocks below (i.e., folding, faulting).

NGSS


4-ESS1-1 Identify evidence from patterns in rock formations and fossils in rock layers to support an explanation for changes in a landscape over time.

How hot does an area have to be to be classified as a desert?

Answer:

Deserts are defined by lack of precipitation, not by temperature. They are areas where precipitation minus evaporation yields less than 10 inches of rain per year. The largest desert on Earth is in Antarctica, a very cold place.



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Florida


SC.5.E.7.6 Describe characteristics (temperature and precipitation) of different climate zones as they relate to latitude, elevation, and proximity to bodies of water.
Weather and Climate video, free
Review Weather-7 practice
Review Weather-9 practice

Utah


UT.4.V.1.c Locate examples of areas that have characteristics of wetlands, forests, or deserts in Utah.

NGSS

A lightning bolt has a huge amount of energy. Which of these kinds of energy is NOT a major component of lightning?

  1. Heat

    No. A lightning bolt can heat the air to over 30,000 °C (54,000 °F)
  2. Electrical

    No. A lightning bolt has a tremendous amount of electrical energy, often several hundred million volts, and several hundred thousand amperes.
  3. Sound

    No. Thunder, the sound energy produced by a lightning bolt, is so loud that it can often be heard up to ten miles away.
  4. Chemical

    Yes. While a lightning bolt can cause chemical changes, very little of the bolt's energy is converted to chemical energy.



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Florida


SC.3.P.10.1 Observe and describe some basic forms of energy, including light, heat, sound, electrical, and the energy of motion.

SC.4.P.10.1 Observe and describe some basic forms of energy, including light, heat, sound, electrical, and the energy of motion.

SC.5.P.10.1 Investigate and describe some basic forms of energy, including light, heat, sound, electrical, chemical, and mechanical.

Utah


UT.8.IV.4.b Trace the conversion of energy from one form of energy to another (e.g., light to chemical to mechanical).

NGSS


4-PS3-2 Make observations to provide evidence that energy can be transferred from place to place by sound, light, heat, and electric currents.

What season is the area that the arrow points to having?

  1. Winter

    Yes! Even though that area is in daylight, the Earth's axis in that hemisphere is pointing away from the Sun. It gets less direct light, and has shorter days.
  2. Spring

    No. For spring, the Earth's axis for that hemisphere would be in between pointing towards the Sun and away from the Sun.
  3. Summer

    No. Although it is daytime in that area, the Earth's axis in that hemisphere is pointing away from the Sun. It gets less direct light, and has shorter days.
  4. Autumn

    No. For autumn, the Earth's axis for that hemisphere would be in between pointing towards the Sun and away from the Sun.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.4.E.5.1 Observe that the patterns of stars in the sky stay the same although they appear to shift across the sky nightly, and different stars can be seen in different seasons.
Global Science video, free, ClosedCaptions
Review Space-5 practice
Review Space-8 practice
Review Space-12 practice

Utah


UT.6.II.2.e Use a model to explain why the seasons are reversed in the Northern and Southern Hemispheres.
Global Science video, free, ClosedCaptions
Review Space-5 practice
Review Space-8 practice
Review Space-12 practice

NGSS


3-ESS2-1 Represent data in tables and graphical displays to describe typical weather conditions expected during a particular season.
Nephoscope video
Pine Cone Weather text page, free
Review Weather-5 practice
Review Weather-6 practice
Review Weather-4 practice
Review Weather-3 practice
Review Space-5 practice
Review Space-8 practice

5-ESS1-2 Represent data in graphical displays to reveal patterns of daily changes in length and direction of shadows, day and night, and the seasonal appearance of some stars in the night sky.
Global Science video, free, ClosedCaptions
Finding Your Way video
Review Space-5 practice
Review Space-8 practice
Review Space-12 practice

When a scientist makes a new discovery, other scientists usually do exactly the same experiment. Why?

  1. They want to get part of the credit.

    No. While replicating an experiment is very important, the scientists who do it usually don't get much credit for their work unless they discover an error in the original experiment.
  2. Repetition is part of the scientific process.

    No. Repetition is when scientists repeat their own experiment several times, not when other scientists do the same experiment.
  3. They think they can make changes to improve the experiment.

    No. By doing exactly the same experiment, they are not changing anything. Instead, they are replicating the experiment as closely as possible.
  4. Replication is part of the scientific process.

    Yes. By replicating the experiment, other scientists can help verify that the results are accurate. There is always a possibility that there was some unnoticed influence on the original experiment, and replication can help spot that.



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Florida


SC.2.N.1.4 Explain how particular scientific investigations should yield similar conclusions when repeated.

SC.5.N.2.2 Recognize and explain that when scientific investigations are carried out, the evidence produced by those investigations should be replicable by others.

>>> Teacher Page: Nature of Science and Dissolving


SC.6.N.1.2 Explain why scientific investigations should be replicable.

SC.7.N.1.2 Differentiate replication (by others) from repetition (multiple trials).

SC.8.N.1.2 Design and conduct a study using repeated trials and replication.

Utah

NGSS

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