Test Your Science Knowledge

Here are some science questions to help you test your general science knowledge. They will also show you which of the Florida, Utah, and NGSS science standards each question is testing.

The questions are chosen randomly, so this quest will be different each time.

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The dark spot in each of these cells contains genetic material called DNA. This part of the cell is called the:

  1. Vacuole

    No. A vacuole is used for storing water or nutrients, not DNA.
  2. Nucleus

    Yes! The nucleus of the cell contains DNA.
  3. Chloroplast

    No. Chloroplasts contain chlorophyll, which is used in photosynthesis.
  4. Ribosome

    No. Ribosomes are parts of the cell that assemble proteins.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.6.L.14.4 Compare and contrast the structure and function of major organelles of plant and animal cells, including cell wall, cell membrane, nucleus, cytoplasm, chloroplasts, mitochondria, and vacuoles.
Osmosis video, checked
Review Cells-1 practice
Review Cells-2 practice
Review Cells-3 practice
Review Cells-4 practice

Utah


UT.7.III.1.c Differentiate between plant and animal cells based on cell wall and cell membrane.
Review Cells-1 practice
Review Cells-2 practice

NGSS


MS-LS1-2 Develop and use a model to describe the function of a cell as a whole and ways parts of cells contribute to the function.
Osmosis video, checked
Review Cells-1 practice
Review Cells-2 practice
Review Cells-3 practice
Review Cells-4 practice

Rainbows are produced by:

  1. Refraction

    Partly correct. Light entering the raindrop is reflected off of the back surface.
  2. Reflection

    Partly correct. As the light passes from air to water, and from water to air, the light is bent or refracted. Different colors are refracted different amounts, separating the colors.
  3. Both reflection and refraction

    Correct! When you see a rainbow, the sun will always be behind you. (There are other, similar looking phenomena which you see when facing the sun, but they are not rainbows.) The sunlight enters each raindrop, is refracted (bent). Different colors are refracted different amounts. When the light hits the far side of the raindrop, part of it goes on through, and part of it is reflected back towards the sun (and towards you.) As it passes leaves the drop, the difference in density from water to air refracts (bends) the light even more, separating the colors into bands for the rainbow.
  4. Neither reflection no refraction

    No. One or both take part in producing the rainbow.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.3.P.10.3 Demonstrate that light travels in a straight line until it strikes an object or travels from one medium to another.
Why Wet Things Turn Dark video, checked
Growing Crystals Under the Microscope video, free, learnalong, checked
Changing the Speed of Light video
Why is Foam White? video, checked
Microscopes: Growing Crystals video, free, learnalong, Updated
Sunglass Science: Birefringence video, free, Updated
Sunglass Science: Polarized Light video, free, Updated
Mirage video, free, ClosedCaptions, Updated
Pinhole Eyeglasses video, checked
A Long Lens text page
Review Light-2 practice
Review Light-3 practice
Review Light-4 practice
Review Light-5 practice
Review Light-1 practice

SC.3.P.10.4 Demonstrate that light can be reflected, refracted, and absorbed.
Why Wet Things Turn Dark video, checked
Growing Crystals Under the Microscope video, free, learnalong, checked
Changing the Speed of Light video
Why is Foam White? video, checked
Onion Crystals video
Microscopes: Growing Crystals video, free, learnalong, Updated
Sunglass Science: Birefringence video, free, Updated
Sunglass Science: Polarized Light video, free, Updated
Mirage video, free, ClosedCaptions, Updated
Pinhole Eyeglasses video, checked
Looking for Rainbows video
A Long Lens text page
Sunlight, Energy, and Crayons text page, free
Review Light-1 practice
Review Light-2 practice
Review Light-3 practice
Review Light-4 practice
Review Light-5 practice

SC.7.P.10.2 Observe and explain that light can be reflected, refracted, and/or absorbed.
Pinhole Eyeglasses video, checked
Why Wet Things Turn Dark video, checked
Growing Crystals Under the Microscope video, free, learnalong, checked
Finding Fat in Foods video, ClosedCaptions, checked
Changing the Speed of Light video
Why is Foam White? video, checked
Onion Crystals video
Microscopes: Growing Crystals video, free, learnalong, Updated
Sunglass Science: Birefringence video, free, Updated
Sunglass Science: Polarized Light video, free, Updated
Mirage video, free, ClosedCaptions, Updated
A Long Lens text page
Sunlight, Energy, and Crayons text page, free
Review Light-1 practice
Review Light-2 practice
Review Light-3 practice
Review Light-4 practice
Review Light-5 practice

SC.8.E.5.11 Identify and compare characteristics of the electromagnetic spectrum such as wavelength, frequency, use, and hazards and recognize its application to an understanding of planetary images and satellite photographs.
Sunprints video
Sunglass Science: Birefringence video, free, Updated
Sunglass Science: Polarized Light video, free, Updated
A Color You Can't See video, free, checked
CD Spectrum text page
Review Light-3 practice

Utah


UT.8.IV.1.e Demonstrate how white light can be separated into the visible color spectrum.
White Balance video, checked
Sunglass Science: Birefringence video, free, Updated
Sunglass Science: Polarized Light video, free, Updated
A Color You Can't See video, free, checked
Sunlight, Energy, and Crayons text page, free
Review Light-3 practice

NGSS


1-PS4-3 Plan and conduct an investigation to determine the effect of placing objects made with different materials in the path of a beam of light.
Pinhole Eyeglasses video, checked
Why Wet Things Turn Dark video, checked
Growing Crystals Under the Microscope video, free, learnalong, checked
Sunprints video
Changing the Speed of Light video
Why is Foam White? video, checked
Onion Crystals video
Microscopes: Growing Crystals video, free, learnalong, Updated
Sunglass Science: Birefringence video, free, Updated
Sunglass Science: Polarized Light video, free, Updated
Mirage video, free, ClosedCaptions, Updated
A Color You Can't See video, free, checked
A Long Lens text page
Review Light-1 practice
Review Light-2 practice
Review Light-3 practice
Review Light-4 practice
Review Light-5 practice

The Earth stays in orbit around the Sun because:

  1. The Sun's gravity pulls on the Earth

    This is only part of the answer.
  2. The Earth's gravity pulls on the Sun

    This is only part of the answer.
  3. The gravity of the Sun and the Earth pull on each other

    Yes! The gravitational attraction between the Earth and the Sun is a result of both the Sun pulling on the Earth and the Earth pulling on the Sun.
  4. Gravity does not keep the Earth in its orbit.

    No. Without the pull of gravity, the Earth would continue moving in a straight path instead of curving around the Sun.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.5.P.13.1 Identify familiar forces that cause objects to move, such as pushes or pulls, including gravity acting on falling objects.
The Slow Race video, free, ClosedCaptions, Updated
Magic Coin video
Making a Compass video, checked
Torque video
Water in a Glass, part 2 video, checked
Water in a Glass, part 3 video, checked
Water in a Glass, part 1 video, checked
Obedient Coin video, checked
Balancing a Meter Stick text page
Review Space-13 quest

SC.8.E.5.9 Explain the impact of objects in space on each other including: 1. the Sun on the Earth including seasons and gravitational attraction 2. the Moon on the Earth, including phases, tides, and eclipses, and the relative position of each body.
Global Science video, ClosedCaptions
Why is a Full Moon So Bright? text page, free, checked
Review Space-13 quest
Review Space-12 practice

SC.6.P.13.2 Explore the Law of Gravity by recognizing that every object exerts gravitational force on every other object and that the force depends on how much mass the objects have and how far apart they are.
Water in a Glass, part 2 video, checked
Water in a Glass, part 3 video, checked
Water in a Glass, part 1 video, checked
Planets and Pennies video, ClosedCaptions
Force, Pressure, and Shoes video, checked
Review Space-13 quest

Utah


UT.3.IV.2.c Pose questions about gravity and forces.

UT.6.III.3.a Describe the forces holding Earth in orbit around the sun, and the moon in orbit around Earth.

NGSS


MS-ESS1-2 Develop and use a model to describe the role of gravity in the motions within galaxies and the solar system.
Planets and Pennies video, ClosedCaptions
Review Space-13 quest
Review Space-10 practice

Which planet is closest to the Earth?

  1. The Moon

    No. The Moon is not a planet.
  2. Mars

    Sometimes, but not always.
  3. Venus

    Sometimes, but not always.
  4. It varies with time.

    Yes. As the planets move around the Sun, their distance from the Earth varies. On different dates, the closest planet may be Mars, Venus, or Mercury.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.5.E.5.2 Recognize the major common characteristics of all planets and compare/contrast the properties of inner and outer planets.

>>> Teacher Page: Our Solar System

Making a Scale Model of the Solar System video, ClosedCaptions
Planets and Pennies video, ClosedCaptions
Review Space-4 practice

SC.8.E.5.7 Compare and contrast the properties of objects in the Solar System including the Sun, planets, and moons to those of Earth, such as gravitational force, distance from the Sun, speed, movement, temperature, and atmospheric conditions.
Making a Scale Model of the Solar System video, ClosedCaptions
Global Science video, ClosedCaptions
Planets and Pennies video, ClosedCaptions
Review Space-4 practice
Review Space-11 practice

Utah


UT.6.III.1.c Use models and graphs that accurately depict scale to compare the size and distance between objects in the solar system.

NGSS


MS-ESS1-3 Analyze and interpret data to determine scale properties of objects in the solar system.
Making a Scale Model of the Solar System video, ClosedCaptions
Global Science video, ClosedCaptions
Planets and Pennies video, ClosedCaptions
How Far is That Planet? text page
Review Space-3 practice
Review Space-2 practice
Review Space-4 practice

Which of the following is arranged from biggest to smallest?

  1. Galaxy, universe, constellation, solar system

  2. Universe, galaxy, constellation, solar system

  3. Universe, constellation, galaxy, solar system

  4. Galaxy, constellation, universe, solar system

Think about it, and when you think you know the answer, then continue.

The answer is 2.

  1. The universe is the largest, containing all galaxies, constellations, and solar systems.
  2. Galaxies come next. Each galaxy contains millions of stars.
  3. Constellations are made up of several individual stars which are often separated by hundreds of lightyears, and only appear close together from our view point on Earth.
  4. Each star can have one or more planets, forming a solar system.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.5.E.5.1 Recognize that a galaxy consists of gas, dust, and many stars, including any objects orbiting the stars. Identify our home galaxy as the Milky Way.
Review Space-2 practice
Review Space-1 practice
Review Space-10 practice

SC.8.E.5.3 Distinguish the hierarchical relationships between planets and other astronomical bodies relative to solar system, galaxy, and universe, including distance, size, and composition.
Making a Scale Model of the Solar System video, ClosedCaptions
Planets and Pennies video, ClosedCaptions
How Far is That Planet? text page
Review Space-3 practice
Review Space-2 practice
Review Space-10 practice

Utah


UT.6.IV.1.c Compare the size of the Solar System to the size of the Milky Way galaxy.
Review Space-2 practice
Review Space-10 practice

NGSS


MS-ESS1-3 Analyze and interpret data to determine scale properties of objects in the solar system.
Making a Scale Model of the Solar System video, ClosedCaptions
Global Science video, ClosedCaptions
Planets and Pennies video, ClosedCaptions
How Far is That Planet? text page
Review Space-3 practice
Review Space-2 practice
Review Space-4 practice

The questions are chosen randomly, so this quest will be different each time.

Get 5 more random questions.

Would you rather see the most recently added questions?



See which questions, videos, experiments, and other resources support each of your local science standards.