Quest: 5th Grade Science Assessment

Back to the SSA page.

Here are some science questions from the Standards for Grades 2-5 to help you test your knowledge of the Next Generation Sunshine State Standards.

The questions are chosen randomly, so this quest will be different each time you reload the page.

* Click here to see only the most recently added questions.



This photograph shows three stages of the life cycle of a silk moth. Which stage is NOT shown?

  1. Egg

    No. The light yellow dots are silk moth eggs.
  2. Larva

    Yes! There are not silk moth caterpillars in the picture.
  3. Pupa

    No. The white, fuzzy ball beside the moth is the cocoon, which contains the pupa.
  4. Adult

    No. The white moth is an adult silk moth.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.2.L.16.1 Observe and describe major stages in the life cycles of plants and animals, including beans and butterflies.
Seed Search video, ClosedCaptions, checked
Review Life Cycle-1 practice
Review Life Cycle-2 practice
Review Life Cycle-3 practice
Review Life Cycle-4 practice

SC.4.L.16.4 Compare and contrast the major stages in the life cycles of Florida plants and animals, such as those that undergo incomplete and complete metamorphosis, and flowering and nonflowering seedbearing
plants.
Orange Slices video, ClosedCaptions
Creating a Sprout Guide text page, photography, free
Review Life Cycle-1 practice
Review Life Cycle-2 practice
Review Plants-4 practice
Review Life Cycle-3 practice
Review Life Cycle-4 practice

Utah


UT.5.V.1.c Compare various examples of offspring that do not initially resemble the parent organism but mature to become similar to the parent organism (e.g., mealworms and darkling beetles, tadpoles and frogs, seedlings and vegetables, caterpillars and butterflies).

NGSS


1-LS3-1 Make observations to construct an evidence-based account that young plants and animals are like, but not exactly like, their parents.

3-LS1-1 Develop models to describe that organisms have unique and diverse life cycles but all have in common birth, growth, reproduction, and death.

Which of the following is NOT a characteristic of ALL mammals?

  1. All mammals have hair.

    No. All mammals DO have hair. Even whales and dolphins have some hair on their skin.
  2. All mammals give birth to live young.

    Yes! While most species of mammals give birth to live young, a few (platypus, echidna) lay eggs.
  3. All mammals have mammary glands.

    No. All mammals DO have mammary glands. In females, these glands can produce milk to feed their young.
  4. All mammals have three bones in their inner ear.

    No. All mammals DO have three bones in their inner ear. These bones are called the malleus, the incus, and the stapes. They transfer vibration from the ear drum to the inner ear.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.3.L.15.1 Classify animals into major groups (mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians, fish, arthropods, vertebrates and invertebrates, those having live births and those which lay eggs) according to their physical characteristics and behaviors.
Feathers video, checked
A Walk in the Park video, checked
Scientific Names video, ClosedCaptions
Review Classify-2 practice
Review Classify-1 practice
Review Classify-3 practice

SC.6.L.15.1 Analyze and describe how and why organisms are classified according to shared characteristics with emphasis on the Linnaean system combined with the concept of Domains.
Scientific Names video, ClosedCaptions
Review Classify-2 practice
Review Classify-1 practice
Review Classify-3 practice

Utah


UT.4.V.3.b Use a simple classification system to classify unfamiliar Utah plants or animals (e.g., fish/amphibians/reptile/bird/mammal, invertebrate/vertebrate, tree/shrub/grass, deciduous/conifers).
A Walk in the Park video, checked
Scientific Names video, ClosedCaptions
Review Classify-2 practice
Review Classify-1 practice
Review Classify-3 practice

UT.7.V.2.c Generalize rules for classification.
Scientific Names video, ClosedCaptions
Review Classify-2 practice
Review Classify-1 practice
Review Classify-3 practice

NGSS

In testing this piece of quartz, I found that it would scratch glass. What property was I testing?

  1. Hardness

    Yes! Hardness is a substance's resistance to being scratched. With a hardness of 7, quartz is hard enough to scratch glass.
  2. Cleavage

    No. Cleavage is the tendency of a mineral to break along planes of weakness to produce pieces with flat, smooth sides. Cleavage involves breaking, not scratching.
  3. Fracture

    No. Fracture is a property of minerals that do NOT break along planes of weakness to produce flat, smooth sides. This involves breaking, not scratching.
  4. Streak

    No. Streak is a test to see the color of a mineral when it is ground into a powder by scratching it on a porcelain streak plate. For streak, we are powdering the mineral, not scratching another substance.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.4.E.6.2 Identify the physical properties of common earth-forming minerals, including hardness, color, luster, cleavage, and streak color, and recognize the role of minerals in the formation of rocks.
What is a Mineral? video, checked
Identifying Minerals video, learnalong
Definition of a Mineral video, checked
Minerals Around You text page, learnalong, checked
Review Minerals-1 practice
Review Minerals-2 practice
Review Minerals-3 practice
Review Minerals-4 practice
Review Minerals-5 practice
Review Minerals-6 practice
Review Minerals-7 practice
Review Minerals-8 practice

Utah


UT.8.III.1.b Observe and describe the minerals found in rocks (e.g., shape, color, luster, texture, hardness).
What is a Mineral? video, checked
Identifying Minerals video, learnalong
What is a Rock? video, learnalong, checked
Definition of a Mineral video, checked
Review Minerals-1 practice
Review Minerals-2 practice
Review Minerals-3 practice
Review Minerals-4 practice
Review Minerals-5 practice
Review Minerals-6 practice
Review Minerals-7 practice
Review Minerals-8 practice

NGSS

wood and ashes

The wood in this pile will be reduced to this much ash when it is burned. What happens to the rest of the mass from the wood?

  1. It was converted into energy.

    No. Burning does not convert matter into energy.
  2. It evaporated.

    No. While any moisture in the wood may have evaporated, wood itself does not evaporate.
  3. It was converted into water and carbon dioxide.

    Yes! Burning converts the cellulose in wood into water vapor and carbon dioxide. The white ash that is left behind is made up of the minerals and nutrients which were taken in by the plant's roots.
  4. The matter is still there. It just got smaller.

    No. If all of the matter was still there, the mass and weight would still be the same. The ash is much lighter than the wood, because the water vapor and carbon dioxide are now part of the air of the room. Still, if we could weigh all of the ash, water vapor, and carbon dioxide, the total mass would still be the same.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.4.P.8.3 Explore the Law of Conservation of Mass by demonstrating that the mass of a whole object is always the same as the sum of the masses of its parts.

SC.8.P.9.1 Explore the Law of Conservation of Mass by demonstrating and concluding that mass is conserved when substances undergo physical and chemical changes.
Making Butter video, free, ClosedCaptions, Updated
Review Matter-2 practice
Review Matter-6 practice

Utah


UT.5.I.1.a Compare the total weight of an object to the weight of its individual parts after being
disassembled.
Review Matter-6 practice

UT.5.I.1.d Investigate chemical reactions in which the total weight of the materials before and after reaction is the same (e.g., cream and vinegar before and after mixing, borax and glue mixed to make a new substance).
Changing Colors, part 1 video
Changing Colors, part 2 video
The Chemistry of Milk video, ClosedCaptions, checked
Polymers and Slime video, free, ClosedCaptions, checked
Review Matter-6 practice

UT.5.I.3.d Compare a physical change to a chemical change.
Changing Colors, part 1 video
Changing Colors, part 2 video
The Chemistry of Milk video, ClosedCaptions, checked
Making Butter video, free, ClosedCaptions, Updated
Chemical and Physical Changes video, ClosedCaptions, checked
Paper Petals video, ClosedCaptions
Changing How We Look at Changing text page, free
Review Matter-4 practice

UT.8.I.4.c Demonstrate that mass is conserved in a chemical reaction (e.g., mix two solutions that result in a color change or formation of a precipitate and weigh the solutions before and after mixing).
Microscopes: Growing Crystals video, free, learnalong, Updated
Growing Crystals Under the Microscope video, free, learnalong, checked
Review Matter-6 practice

NGSS


5-PS1-2 Measure and graph quantities to provide evidence that regardless of the type of change that occurs when heating, cooling, or mixing substances, the total weight of matter is conserved.
Making Butter video, free, ClosedCaptions, Updated
The Difference Between Weight and Mass video, checked
Ice Cream Science video, checked
Chemical and Physical Changes video, ClosedCaptions, checked
Air has Weight text page
Review Matter-2 practice
Review Matter-6 practice

MS-PS1-5 Develop and use a model to describe how the total number of atoms does not change in a chemical reaction and thus mass is conserved.

Notice that the very back point on this Mule Deer's antlers is split. This is a genetic trait which is becoming more and more common because hunters would rather shoot deer with perfect antlers. This is an example of:

  1. why hunting deer is a bad idea.

    No. Actually, deer hunting is very important. Because we have killed off many of their natural predators, if hunters did not control their population, large numbers of them would starve to death.
  2. an adaptation that improves an organism's chance for survival.

    Yes. Because hunters are less likely to shoot it, this deer is more likely to survive long enough to reproduce, passing this trait on to its offspring.
  3. an acquired trait.

    No. This is a genetic trait, not an acquired trait.
  4. why antlers are more useful than horns.

    No. Antlers and horns serve different functions, but both are useful to the animal that has them.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.5.L.15.1 Describe how, when the environment changes, differences between individuals allow some plants and animals to survive and reproduce while others die or move to new locations.
Who Evolved on First? text page, free, checked
Review Adaptation-1 practice
Review Adaptation-5 practice
Review Adaptation-6 practice

SC.7.L.15.2 Explore the scientific theory of evolution by recognizing and explaining ways in which genetic variation and environmental factors contribute to evolution by natural selection and diversity of organisms.
Who Evolved on First? text page, free, checked
Review Adaptation-1 practice

Utah


UT.5.V.2.c Describe how a particular physical attribute may provide an advantage for survival in one environment but not in another (e.g., heavy fur in arctic climates keep animals warm whereas in hot desert climates it would cause overheating; flippers on such animals as sea lions and seals provide excellent swimming structures in the water but become clumsy and awkward on land; cacti retain the right amount of water in arid regions but would develop root rot in a more temperate region; fish gills have the ability to absorb oxygen in water but not on land).

UT.7.IV.2.a Predict why certain traits (e.g., structure of teeth, body structure, coloration) are more likely to offer an advantage for survival of an organism.
Selective Smelling video, checked
Onion Crystals video
Who Evolved on First? text page, free, checked
Thoughts on an Exoskeleton text page, free
Review Adaptation-1 practice
Review Adaptation-2 practice
Review Adaptation-5 practice
Review Adaptation-6 practice

NGSS


3-LS4-2 Use evidence to construct an explanation for how the variations in characteristics among individuals of the same species may provide advantages in surviving, finding mates, and reproducing.
Flowers video, ClosedCaptions
Who Evolved on First? text page, free, checked
Review Adaptation-1 practice
Review Adaptation-3 practice
Review Adaptation-4 practice
Review Adaptation-5 practice
Review Adaptation-6 practice

The questions are chosen randomly, so this quest will be different each time you reload the page.