waves

Whistle Stick

This experiment is a trick that my Grandfather taught me when I was very young. He called it a "whistle stick", and making one brought back delightful memories from my childhood. This experiment requires the use of a sharp knife, so if you are young, you may need adult assistance. It is not difficult, but even adults should keep safety in mind.


To try this you will need:

AM/FM Radio Waves

This week's experiment comes from a question that I received about which is better, AM or FM radio. As we shall see, the answer depends on what properties you are basing your answer on. As we will see, each has advantages and disadvantages.

A Real Tuning Fork

If you have ever played with a tuning fork, you know that they are interesting and fun, but they can also be expensive. For this experiment, we will use a regular fork from your kitchen to produce a beautiful tone.

Pinhole Eyeglasses

This experiment is something that I ran into MANY years ago when I first began wearing glasses. If you wear glasses, then you know how challenging it can be to find your glasses if you have laid them down and can't remember where you put them. You need your glasses to find your glasses. This is a way that you can make a quick, emergency pair of glasses for yourself or someone else that needs them.

A Color You Can't See

Think of all the colors you can see? Think about rainbows, field full of flowers, and holiday decorations. With all of the colors that we can see, there are many more that we can't see, at least with just our eyes. With the help of a cell phone, you can see some of those invisible colors.

Spoon Bells

Any time you hear a sound, it is because something is vibrating. Place your fingers against your throat and hum. You will feel your throat vibrate. We usually hear sounds from vibrations that travel through the air, but solids can be much better at carrying vibrations.

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