minerals

Sorting Sediments


One of the main things that we use for identifying clastic sedimentary rocks is grain size, the size of the pieces. Rocks that have been deposited by water or wind tend to be very well sorted, with all of the pieces being pretty much the same size. How does that happen?

Calcite


Mineral name: Calcite

Chemical formula: CaCO3

Physical properties: vitreous luster, hardness 3, white streak, three directions of cleavage forming rhombohedral shapes, fizzes in dilute hydrochloric acid.

Putting it all together

Now that we have gone through each part of the definition, it is time to put them all together. To do this, you will need that same materials you used for the previous parts of the definition:

As many of the items from the following list as you can:

Understanding "Solid"

At first, the word "solid" may seem simple, but when it comes to rocks and minerals, it can be tricky.

To explore this, we will use the same materials that we used to explore "naturally occurring." You will need as many of the items from the following list as you can find:

What "Large Deposits" Means

This part of the definition is not as definite as the other parts. How large is "large?" Generally it means that the deposit is large enough to show up on a geologic map.

To explore this, we will use the same materials that we used to explore "naturally occurring." You will need as many of the items from the following list as you can find:

Understanding "Inorganic"

Like "naturally occurring", the word "inorganic" is part of the definition of a mineral. This word can be confusing. It reminds many people of organic food, but in the science of geology is has a very different meaning. In this case, inorganic means that the object is not alive, and was not a part of anything that was alive.

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