Test Your Science Knowledge

Here are some science questions to help you test your general science knowledge. They will also show you which of the Florida, Utah, and NGSS science standards each question is testing.

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I placed this plant near the window. After two hours, I examined it. What would you expect to happen to the leaves during that time?

  1. The leaves will turn towards the light.

    Yes. The leaves will move and turn so that their surface gets as much light as possible. The following is a time lapse video, showing what happened with the plant.

  2. The leaves will turn away from the light.

    No. The leaves need light, so they turn to catch as much light as possible.
  3. The leaves will turn a darker green.

    No. While more light could eventually cause the leaves to grow and darken, the process would not happen in a couple of hours.
  4. The leaves will not change.

    No. Plants are adapted to turn their leaves towards a light source.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.3.L.14.2 Investigate and describe how plants respond to stimuli (heat, light, gravity), such as the way plant stems grow toward light and their roots grow downward in response to gravity.
Review Plants-1 practice

SC.5.L.17.1 Compare and contrast adaptations displayed by animals and plants that enable them to survive in different environments such as life cycles variations, animal behaviors and physical characteristics.
A Walk in the Park video
Nature Watching video
Calling a Woodpecker video, free
Selective Smelling video
Seed Search video, ClosedCaptions
Flowers video, ClosedCaptions
Onion Crystals video
Review Plants-1 practice
Review Adaptation-2 practice
Review Adaptation-3 practice
Review Adaptation-4 practice
Review Adaptation-5 practice
Review Adaptation-6 practice

Utah


UT.8.IV.4.d Investigate and report the response of various organisms to changes in energy (e.g., plant response to light, human response to motion, sound, light, insects’ response to changes in light intensity).

UT.3.II.2.b Predict the effects of changes in the environment (e.g., temperature, light, moisture) on a living organism.

UT.3.V.1.b Observe and report how sunlight affects plant growth.

NGSS


2-LS2-1 Plan and conduct an investigation to determine if plants need sunlight and water to grow.

3-LS3-1 Analyze and interpret data to provide evidence that plants and animals have traits inherited from parents and that variation of these traits exists in a group of similar organisms.
Who Evolved on First? text page, free
Review Cells-4 practice

K-ESS2-2 Construct an argument supported by evidence for how plants and animals (including humans) can change the environment to meet their needs.
Seed Search video, ClosedCaptions
Review Plants-1 practice

4-LS1-1 Construct an argument that plants and animals have internal and external structures that function to support survival, growth, behavior, and reproduction.
Bird Bones video
Feathers video
Heartless Plants video, ClosedCaptions
Nature Watching video
Calling a Woodpecker video, free
Pumpkin Guts video, free, ClosedCaptions
Seed Search video, ClosedCaptions
Orange Slices video, ClosedCaptions
How Does a Butterfly Fly? text page, free
Thoughts on an Exoskeleton text page, free
Eye Shine text page
Review Plants-3 practice
Review Plants-1 practice
Review Plants-5 practice
Review Plants-6 practice
Review Plants-7 practice
Review Plants-8 practice

MS-LS1-5 Construct a scientific explanation based on evidence for how environmental and genetic factors influence the growth of organisms.

What is the difference between speed and velocity?

  1. Speed is faster.

    No. An object's speed is part of its velocity.
  2. Velocity has to be in a specific direction.

    Yes! An object's speed is measured in distance per time, such as 20 miles per hour. Its velocity must include a direction, such as north at 20 miles per hour.
  3. They mean the same thing.

    No. The two terms have different meanings.
  4. Speed is a general term and velocity is a scientific term.

    No. Both terms are used in science, and they mean different things.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.4.P.12.1 Recognize that an object in motion always changes its position and may change its direction.

Utah


UT.3.III.2.e Show how these concepts apply to various activities (e.g., batting a ball, kicking a ball, hitting a golf ball with a golf club) in terms of force, motion, speed, direction, and distance (e.g. slow, fast, hit hard, hit soft).

NGSS


MS-PS3-1 Construct and interpret graphical displays of data to describe the relationships of kinetic energy to the mass of an object and to the speed of an object.

A lightning bolt has a huge amount of energy. Which of these kinds of energy is NOT a major component of lightning?

  1. Heat

    No. A lightning bolt can heat the air to over 30,000 °C (54,000 °F)
  2. Electrical

    No. A lightning bolt has a tremendous amount of electrical energy, often several hundred million volts, and several hundred thousand amperes.
  3. Sound

    No. Thunder, the sound energy produced by a lightning bolt, is so loud that it can often be heard up to ten miles away.
  4. Chemical

    Yes. While a lightning bolt can cause chemical changes, very little of the bolt's energy is converted to chemical energy.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.3.P.10.1 Observe and describe some basic forms of energy, including light, heat, sound, electrical, and the energy of motion.

SC.4.P.10.1 Observe and describe some basic forms of energy, including light, heat, sound, electrical, and the energy of motion.

SC.5.P.10.1 Investigate and describe some basic forms of energy, including light, heat, sound, electrical, chemical, and mechanical.

Utah


UT.8.IV.4.b Trace the conversion of energy from one form of energy to another (e.g., light to chemical to mechanical).

NGSS


4-PS3-2 Make observations to provide evidence that energy can be transferred from place to place by sound, light, heat, and electric currents.

While this spoon appears to have a broken handle, it is just the result of how the water affects the light. This is an example of:

  1. Refraction

    Yes! Refraction bends light as it moves from one substance to another. As the light passes from the water to the air, its path is changed, making it appear that the spoon is broken.
  2. Reflection

    No. While some light is reflected from the glass, it is not responsible for the bending of the light.
  3. Absorption

    No. The water and glass are both clear, telling us that very little of the light is being absorbed. Absorption does not bend the light.
  4. Diffusion

    No. Diffusion is the scattering of light as it is reflected in many different directions. Diffusion would make the image cloudy and blurry.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.3.P.10.3 Demonstrate that light travels in a straight line until it strikes an object or travels from one medium to another.

SC.3.P.10.4 Demonstrate that light can be reflected, refracted, and absorbed.

SC.7.P.10.2 Observe and explain that light can be reflected, refracted, and/or absorbed.

Utah


UT.8.IV.1.b Compare the transfer of energy (i.e., sound, light, earthquake waves, heat) through various mediums.

NGSS


1-PS4-3 Plan and conduct an investigation to determine the effect of placing objects made with different materials in the path of a beam of light.

MS-PS4-2 Develop and use a model to describe that waves are reflected, absorbed, or transmitted through various materials.

Which of the following states of matter will change its shape to fit its container, but not its size?

  1. Solid

    No. Under normal pressure, solids do not change their shape or size to fit their container.
  2. Liquid

    Yes. Liquids will take on the shape of their container, but do not change their size.
  3. Gas

    No. Gases will expand to fill their container, taking on both its shape and size.
  4. Plasma

    No. Like gases, plasmas take on the size and shape of their container.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.2.P.8.3 Recognize that solids have a definite shape and that liquids and gases take the shape of their container.

SC.5.P.8.1 Compare and contrast the basic properties of solids, liquids, and gases, such as mass, volume, color, texture, and temperature.

>>> Teacher Page: States of Matter


SC.8.P.8.1 Explore the scientific theory of atoms (also known as atomic theory) by using models to explain the motion of particles in solids, liquids, and gases.

Utah


UT.5.I.2.a Identify the physical properties of matter (e.g., hard, soft, solid, liquid, gas).

UT.7.I.1.c Diagram the arrangement of particles in the physical states of matter (i.e., solid, liquid, gas).

UT.8.I.1.b Classify substances based on their chemical and physical properties (e.g., reacts with water, does not react with water, flammable or nonflammable, hard or soft, flexible or nonflexible, evaporates or melts at room temperature).

NGSS

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See which questions, videos, experiments, and other resources support each of your local science standards.