Test Your Science Knowledge

Here are some science questions to help you test your general science knowledge. They will also show you which of the Florida, Utah, and NGSS science standards each question is testing.

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A lightning bolt has a huge amount of energy. Which of these kinds of energy is NOT a major component of lightning?

  1. Heat

    No. A lightning bolt can heat the air to over 30,000 °C (54,000 °F)
  2. Electrical

    No. A lightning bolt has a tremendous amount of electrical energy, often several hundred million volts, and several hundred thousand amperes.
  3. Sound

    No. Thunder, the sound energy produced by a lightning bolt, is so loud that it can often be heard up to ten miles away.
  4. Chemical

    Yes. While a lightning bolt can cause chemical changes, very little of the bolt's energy is converted to chemical energy.



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Florida


SC.3.P.10.1 Observe and describe some basic forms of energy, including light, heat, sound, electrical, and the energy of motion.

SC.4.P.10.1 Observe and describe some basic forms of energy, including light, heat, sound, electrical, and the energy of motion.

SC.5.P.10.1 Investigate and describe some basic forms of energy, including light, heat, sound, electrical, chemical, and mechanical.

Utah


UT.8.IV.4.b Trace the conversion of energy from one form of energy to another (e.g., light to chemical to mechanical).

NGSS


4-PS3-2 Make observations to provide evidence that energy can be transferred from place to place by sound, light, heat, and electric currents.

Which position would the Moon be in during an eclipse of the Sun?

  1. A

    No. In this position, the Earth would not be in the Moon's shadow.
  2. B

    Yes! Solar eclipses only happen during a new moon, but even then, the alignment has to be just right for the Moon's shadow to fall on the Earth.
  3. C

    No. In this position, the Earth would not be in the Moon's shadow.
  4. D

    No. In this position, the Earth would not be in the Moon's shadow. You might get a lunar eclipse in this position, but not a solar eclipse.



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Florida


SC.4.E.5.2 Describe the changes in the observable shape of the moon over the course of about a month.
Why is a Full Moon So Bright? text page, free
Review Space-6 practice
Review Space-7 practice
Review Space-9 practice

Utah


UT.3.I.1.b Explain that the sun is the source of light that lights the moon.
Why is a Full Moon So Bright? text page, free
Review Space-6 practice
Review Space-7 practice
Review Space-9 practice

UT.6.I.1.a Describe changes in the appearance of the moon during a month.
Why is a Full Moon So Bright? text page, free
Review Space-6 practice
Review Space-7 practice
Review Space-9 practice

NGSS


MS-ESS1-1 Develop and use a model of the Earth-sun-moon system to describe the cyclic patterns of lunar phases, eclipses of the sun and moon, and seasons.
Global Science video, free, ClosedCaptions
Why is a Full Moon So Bright? text page, free
Review Space-6 practice
Review Space-7 practice
Review Space-9 practice
Review Space-12 practice

While this spoon appears to have a broken handle, it is just the result of how the water affects the light. This is an example of:

  1. Refraction

    Yes! Refraction bends light as it moves from one substance to another. As the light passes from the water to the air, its path is changed, making it appear that the spoon is broken.
  2. Reflection

    No. While some light is reflected from the glass, it is not responsible for the bending of the light.
  3. Absorption

    No. The water and glass are both clear, telling us that very little of the light is being absorbed. Absorption does not bend the light.
  4. Diffusion

    No. Diffusion is the scattering of light as it is reflected in many different directions. Diffusion would make the image cloudy and blurry.



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Florida


SC.3.P.10.3 Demonstrate that light travels in a straight line until it strikes an object or travels from one medium to another.

SC.3.P.10.4 Demonstrate that light can be reflected, refracted, and absorbed.

SC.7.P.10.2 Observe and explain that light can be reflected, refracted, and/or absorbed.

Utah


UT.8.IV.1.b Compare the transfer of energy (i.e., sound, light, earthquake waves, heat) through various mediums.

NGSS


1-PS4-3 Plan and conduct an investigation to determine the effect of placing objects made with different materials in the path of a beam of light.

MS-PS4-2 Develop and use a model to describe that waves are reflected, absorbed, or transmitted through various materials.

I put a paper plate on top of a glass of water. I turned it over, and the water stayed in the glass.

The weight of the water is pushing down on the paper plate, but the plate stays in the glass because the pull of gravity is being balanced by another force. What is that force?

  1. Attraction

    No. The slight attraction between the water and the glass is not enough to balance the pull of gravity.
  2. Air pressure

    Yes! Because the plate is keeping outside air from entering the glass, outside air pressure is keeping the plate in place. As long as the outside air pressure is enough to balance the weight of the water and the plate, it will stay in place. If you made a small hole in the glass to let outside air get in, that would unbalance things, and the water would fall out.
  3. Surface tension

    No. The water tension at the surface of the water would not balance the force of gravity.
  4. The weight of the paper card

    No. Gravity is pulling down on the paper plate and the water. The weight of the paper does not help balance the force of gravity.



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Florida


SC.2.P.13.3 Recognize that objects are pulled toward the ground unless something holds them up.

SC.3.E.5.4 Explore the Law of Gravity by demonstrating that gravity is a force that can be overcome.

SC.5.P.13.4 Investigate and explain that when a force is applied to an object but it does not move, it is because another opposing force is being applied by something in the environment so that the forces are balanced.

SC.6.P.13.3 Investigate and describe that an unbalanced force acting on an object changes its speed, or direction of motion, or both.

Utah


UT.3.III.2.c Compare the relative effects of forces of different strengths on an object (e.g., strong wind affects an object differently than a breeze).

UT.4.II.1.c Investigate evidence that air is a substance (e.g., takes up space, moves as wind, temperature can be measured).

NGSS


3-PS2-1 Plan and conduct an investigation to provide evidence of the effects of balanced and unbalanced forces on the motion of an object.

MS-PS2-2 Plan an investigation to provide evidence that the change in an object’s motion depends on the sum of the forces on the object and the mass of the object.

I used a Density Column to show that olives are denser than cherry tomatoes. To follow proper scientific procedure, the experiment needs to be checked by repetition and replication. What is the difference between repetition and replication?

  1. Repetition means that I do the same experiment again. Replication means that other people do exactly the same experiment again.

    Yes! To confirm your results it is important for you to repeat exactly the same experiment again (repetition) and then for other people to do exactly the same experiment again. (replication). If any of the results from repetition or replication are different from your original data, your original results are NOT confirmed, and you need to do more work.
  2. Repetition means that I do the same experiment again. Replication means that I do the experiment again after correcting errors.

    No. Replication is when other people to do exactly the same experiment.
  3. Repetition means that I do the same experiment again. Replication means that other people try to improve on my experiment.

    No. Replication is when other people to do exactly the same experiment.
  4. Repetition means that I do the experiment again after correcting errors.. Replication means that other people do exactly the same experiment again.

    No. Repetition means that I do the same experiment again.



Click to see which state standards this question tests, and which of my videos, experiments, and other resources support that topic.

Florida


SC.2.N.1.4 Explain how particular scientific investigations should yield similar conclusions when repeated.

SC.5.N.1.3: Recognize and explain the need for repeated experimental trials.

>>> Teacher Page: Nature of Science and Dissolving


SC.5.N.2.2 Recognize and explain that when scientific investigations are carried out, the evidence produced by those investigations should be replicable by others.

>>> Teacher Page: Nature of Science and Dissolving


SC.8.N.1.2 Design and conduct a study using repeated trials and replication.

Utah

NGSS


3-5-ETS1-3 Plan and carry out fair tests in which variables are controlled and failure points are considered to identify aspects of a model or prototype that can be improved.

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